2017 - 2018 Colloquia

Title: Central zeros of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients

Date: Wednesday, September 27, 2017
speaker: Dr. Robert W. Donley, Jr (QCC)
Time: 1pm—2pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

Clebsch-Gordan coefficients play a central role in classical particle physics, representation theory, and special functions.  Based on Wigner's formula (1931), we give a new combinatorial procedure for computing these coefficients using Pascal's triangle.  These methods lead to a strong proof of a conjecture by Brudno and Rau on a certain vanishing condition.  In turn, nearby families of zeros are revealed and considered.  The overall program is joint work with Won Geun Kim and M. S. Ravi. 

Title: Geometry of Hilbert schemes of points on algebraic surfaces

Date: Wednesday, October 11, 2017
speaker: Dr. Ruijie Yang (Stonybrook)
Time: 1pm—2pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

Symmetric product of algebraic varieties is an important class in algebraic geometry. It's known classically that the symmetric product of a smooth algebraic curve is smooth. But they are singular for algebraic surfaces. Hilbert schemes of points provide a natural desingularization for these symmetric products. In this talk,  I will first discuss the geometry of symmetric products and Hilbert schemes of points on algebraic surfaces. Then I will talk about joint work with Tim Ryan about certain invariants associated to (nested) Hilbert schemes of points.

Title: On Orthogonal Gabor Bases Over Z_p^d

Date: Wednesday, October 25, 2017
speaker: Dr. Azita Mayeli (QCC)
Time: 1pm—2pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

After a quick introduction to the Gabor bases in classical settings R^n and the motivation for studying them, I will introduce these bases in finite dimensional vector spaces over the finite cyclic of primes, i.e. Z_p^d. The study and investigation of these bases has analytic, number theoretic and combinatorial aspects. The analytic arguments come in the form of Fourier analytic inequalities, the number theoretic aspects involve the analysis of exponential sums and the combinatorial arguments involve tiling and the study of directions sets.

Title: Outer Space

Date: Wednesday, November 8, 2017
speaker: Dr. Jonathon Funk (QCC
Time: 1pm—2pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

George Bergman proves that an extended automorphism of a group must be inner.   We shall give a new proof of this fact, in an effort to match concepts of combinatorial group theory with categorical ones to some extent.   Then we enter Outer space by considering outer maps between finitely presented groups.  The new proof is helpful because we can adapt it to show that also an extended outer automorphism of a finitely presented group must be inner, so that its outer class is the identity.  In other words, the only extended outer automorphism is the trivial one.  These facts have geometric interpretations that I shall attempt to explain.  I will also try to explain the wider significance of the project.

 

Title: Quantum Theory and Group Representations

Date: Wednesday, November 15, 2017
speaker: Dr. Peter Woit (Columbia University)
Time: 1pm—2pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract
Some aspects of the relationship of quantum mechanics to the theory of unitary Lie group representations have been well-known since the early days of the subject.  The experience of teaching a course and writing a book aimed at explaining these relations made clear to me several parts of this story that I hadn't earlier appreciated.  In this talk I'll go over the general story of how quantum mechanics and group representation theory are related, emphasizing the simplest and most concrete examples. In addition, I'll try and explain some of the less well-known ideas about these relations which became clear to me and which others may perhaps find enlightening.

 

Title: Hedging a Long Term Supply Commitment with Short Term Futures Contracts

Date: Wednesday, November 29, 2017
speaker: Dr. Chunhui Yu (Farmingdale State College)
Time: 1pm—2pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

Under the constraint of terminal risk, we search for an optimal deterministic strategy to reduce the running risk in hedging a long-term commitment with short-term futures contracts. An explicit solution is given if the underlying stock follows the simple stochastic differential equation \(dS_t=\mu dt+\sigma dB_t\), where \(B_t\)  is the standard Brownian motion. Our work generalizes the results of several previous researchers. Some related undergraduate research projects will also be introduced. 

 

Title: Measuring Students’ Information Literacy Skills in a MATH Writing Intensive Course

Date: Wednesday, Janurary 31, 2018
speaker: Prof.  Mercedes Franco (QCC) and Prof. Christine (Mi-Seon) Kim (QCC)
Time: 1pm—2pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

This study examined how information literacy (IL) instruction helps increase students’ information literacy skills and how IL instruction impacts on students writing performance in a MATH Writing Intensive course during the fall semester of 2016. Classes were divided into two groups: an experimental group with library sessions and a control group with no library session. Pretests and posttests were given to students to measure their IL skills. Students' research papers from both groups were scored by the Information Literacy VALUE Rubric developed by Association of American College & University (AAC&U).  Results were mixed. Data indicated students’ improvement in information literacy skills after the library instruction but there was no relationship between two groups on grade.

Title: Mapping Class Groups of surfaces and Lefschetz Fibrations

Date: Wednesday, February 21, 2018
speaker: Dr. Yusuf Gurtas (QCC)
Time: 12:30pm—1:30pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

In this talk we will begin with the definition of the Mapping Class Group M_g of a two dimensional, oriented, closed, genus-g surface S_g.  This will be followed by the presentation of M_g along with relations satisfied by its generators. Then we will point out to the connection between the Mapping Class Group of a surface S_g and a closed, oriented, symplectic 4-manifold that has the structure of a Lefschetz fibration. Timepermitting we will point out to topological significance of one of these relations calledLantern relation.

Title: OHT 101 - Introduction to Online/Hybrid Teaching

Date: Wednesday, February 28, 2018
speaker: Dr. Zeynep Akcay (QCC)
Time: 12:10pm—1:00pm
Room: S-222
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

In this talk, some technologies used in online/hybrid teaching will be introduced. These include the ones used for creating and sharing videos such as PowerPoint, Audacity, Camtasia and YouTube. Using LMS (Learning Management Systems) such as Blackboard effectively will be illustrated. Pros and cons of online/hybrid teaching will be discussed. Examples from hybrid MA 119 and MA 440 will be shared.

Title: The Lie groupoid analogue of a symplectic Lie group

Date: Wednesday, March 14, 2018
speaker: Dr. David Pham (QCC)
Time: 12:10pm—1:00pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

A symplectic Lie group is a Lie group with a left-invariant symplectic form.  Its Lie algebra structure is that of a quasi-Frobenius Lie algebra.  In this talk, I will identify the groupoid analogue of a symplectic Lie group.  I call the aforementioned structure a t-symplectic Lie groupoid; the ``t" is motivated by the fact that each target fiber of a t-symplectic Lie groupoid is a symplectic manifold.  For a Lie groupoid (G,M), we show that there is a one-to-one correspondence between quasi-Frobenius Lie algebroid structures on the associated Lie algebroid AG and t-symplectic Lie groupoid structures on (G,M).  

Title: Differential Operators on Triangular Algebras

Date: Wednesday, April 25, 2018
speaker: Dr. Uma Iyer (BCC)
Time: 12:30pm—1:30pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

In this talk we present definition of the algebra of differential operators on noncommutative algebras.We then give a concrete example by studying triangular algebras. We also identify ideals in this ring. This is joint work with M. S. Datt and G. K. Rao.  Lastly, we will present questions to be pursued further.

Title: Some Existence and Uniqueness Results for Solutions of Einstein's Equations

Date: Wednesday, May 9, 2018
speaker: Dr. CanerKoca (New York City College of Technology)
Time: 12:30pm—1:30pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

Riemannian Geometry is a popular branch of mathematics which is concerned with measuring quantities such as angles, lengths, areas, volumes, and above all, curvature of shapes, in all dimensions. In the first part of the talk, I will give a picturesque survey of basic definitions and theorems in Riemannian Geometry; fundamental concepts such as Riemannian Metric, Gauss Curvature, Genus, Geodesics, Riemann Curvature Tensor, and Ricci Flow will be introduced with concrete examples. I will also describe Einstein's Field Equations in General Relativity, which are a second order geometric PDE, whose Riemannian "no-boundary" solutions are of key interest in Stephen Hawking's quantum gravity program. In the second part of the talk, I will present various existence and uniqueness results for Riemannian solutions of Einstein's Field Equations which my collaborators and I proved in recent years.

Title: CUNY Start Math at QCC: Program Design and Pedagogy

Date: Wednesday, May 16, 2018
speaker: Dr. Diana Berkowitz, Bonnie Flaherty, Lorena Castro, Asmaa Ahmad, Arlene Callwood, Kevin Winkler, Gregory Fein, Walter Rosenthal (QCC)
Time: 12:10pm—1:00pm
Room: S-213
Refreshments will be served
Abstract

CUNY Start began at Queensborough College in Fall 2011 and has since served over 2,000 Queensborough students, providing intensive preparation in academic reading/writing, math, and "college success" seminars to students who have been identified as needing significant skill development before beginning many of their credit-bearing courses. CUNY Start seeks to both minimize time students spend in non-credit developmental courses and to foster high levels of persistence once students begin their degree programs. Members of the CUNY Start instructional, advising, administration, and professional development team will present information about the history, design, pedagogical approach, and outcomes of the CUNY Start Math programs at QCC.

Campus Cultural Centers

Kupferberg Holocaust Center (KHC)Opens in a new window
Kupferberg Holocaust Center Opens in a new window

The KHC uses the lessons of the Holocaust to educate current and future generations about the ramifications of unbridled prejudice, racism and stereotyping.

Queensborough Performing Arts CenterOpens in a new window
QPAC: Performing Arts CenterOpens in a new window

QPAC is an invaluable entertainment company in this region with a growing national reputation. The arts at QPAC continues to play a vital role in transforming lives and building stronger communities.

Queensborough Art GalleryOpens in a new window
QCC Art GalleryOpens in a new window

The QCC Art Gallery of the City University of New York is a vital educational and cultural resource for Queensborough Community College, the Borough of Queens and the surrounding communities.