Courses in Philosophy

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NOTE: Courses in the PHIL-series (formerly the SS-600 series) can be elected to fulfill a humanities elective and a liberal arts elective, but may not be used to fulfill a social science requirement in any curriculum.

PHIL-101 Introduction to Philosophy (formerly SS-610)

3 class hours; 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.

Fundamental philosophic problems presented through the study of several major philosophical writings, such as those of Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Kant, Hume, Mill, and Whitehead.

PHIL-120 Philosophy of Religion (formerly SS-620)

3 class hours; 3 credits - Offered as needed.
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.

Central concepts in religious thought, such as God, faith, and immortality; problems of religious knowledge and revelation. Problems connectedwith the relation of theology and philosophy discussedwith reference to selected medieval, modern, and contemporary texts.

PHIL-130 Ethics: Theories of the Good Life (formerly SS-630)

3 class hours; 3 credits - Offered as needed.
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.

Basic concepts and problems of ethics. Nature of values, virtue, moral judgment, and obligation considered and illustrated through writings of the major philosophers of the Western tradition, including Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Spinoza, Kant,Moore, and Stevenson.

PHIL-135 Business Ethics (formerly SS-635)

3 class hours; 3 credits - Offered as needed.
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.

Explores the topic of business ethics from legal, social, and primarily philosophical perspectives focusing on basic issues, such as conflicts of interest, civil rights, social justice, ecology, consumerism, and corporate and individual responsibility. Various ethical principles and traditions discussed in order to reveal ethical problems arising from business practices. Codes of conduct of various professional associations examined in order to discover how they attempt to regulate professional behavior.

PHIL-140 MedicalEthics (formerly SS-640)

3 class hours; 3 credits - Offered as needed.
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.

A consideration of the ethical implications of modern medical research and practice. Topics include professional versus universal ethics, the rights of patients,genetic engineering, truth and information in medicine, the concept of mental illness; experimentation on human subjects and public health policy.

PHIL-145 Computers and Ethics (formerly SS-645)

3 class hours; 3 credits - Offered as needed.
BE-122 (OR 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.

A consideration of the impact that computers have on society, emphasizing the effects on values produced by computerization and the responsibility that computer professionals have. Topics include: the process of ethical decision-making, privacy and confidentiality, computer crime, harassment, personal identification, checking honesty, mechanization, data secrecy, “computer” errors, computer decisions, proprietary rights, computer modeling, technological dependence, and professional codes.

PHIL-150 Logic: The Art of Thinking (formerly SS-650)

3 class hours; 3 credits - Offered as needed.
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.

Main principles of deductive and inductive inference with an introduction to classical and traditional logic.

PHIL-165 American Philosophy (formerly SS-665)

3 class hours; 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.

A survey of major American thinkers from colonial times to the present. Figures such as Emerson, Thoreau, Peirce, James, Royce, C. I. Lewis and Dewey will be considered.

PHIL-180 Perspectives on Death and Dying (formerly SS-680)

3 class hours; 3 credits - Offered as needed.
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.

Designed to help the student gain insight into the phenomena of death and dying in American and other societies. An interdisciplinary approach used to explore the meaning of death for a philosophy of life, drawing upon writings from medicine and nursing, the liberal arts, and the humanities. Group discussions and guest lecturers.

Faculty teaching Philosophy



Social Sciences Disciplines