General Education (Pathways)

At Queensborough Community College, we celebrate the art and science of teaching and learning, nurture the growth of the individual student in a support environment, and establish an atmosphere of mutual respect and understanding. A student graduating with an associate degree in a transfer program will meet requirements for successful transfer into the upper division of a baccalaureate program. A student graduating with an associate degree in a career program will demonstrate mastery of discipline-specific knowledge, skills, and tools required for entry into or advancement in the job market in his or her field.

General education is a critical part of these associate degree programs. It is intended to develop basic knowledge, skills, and values for lifelong learning and for performance in any career or profession. Courses in this part of the degree program complement the remaining courses in the major, depending on the curriculum of choice. General education prepares students to:

  1. Communicate effectively through reading, writing, listening, and speaking
  2. Use analytical reasoning to identify issues or problems and evaluate evidence in order to make informed decisions
  3. Reason quantitatively and mathematically as required in their fields of interest and in everyday life
  4. Use information management and technology skills effectively for academic research and lifelong learning
  5. Integrate knowledge and skills in their program of study
  6. Differentiate and make informed decisions about issues based on multiple value systems
  7. Work collaboratively in diverse groups directed at accomplishing learning objectives
  8. Use historical or social sciences perspectives to examine formation of ideas, human behavior, social institutions, or social processes
  9. Employ concepts and methods of the natural and physical sciences to make informed judgments
  10. Apply aesthetic and intellectual criteria in the evaluation or creation of works in the humanities or the arts

In the City University of New York (CUNY), general education is also referred to as the Pathways common core. Completing the common core at any one college in CUNY means that students have completed the common core for any other college in CUNY. For students in an A.A. or A.S. degree program, the common core is the first 30 credits of the program; its purpose is to develop a broad range of knowledge and skills and to build a solid intellectual foundation on which students can engage in more sophisticated study and analysis at successively higher levels as they complete their degrees. For students in career or A.A.S. degree programs, the common core is approximately 20 credits. For every degree program at the college, the Pathways common core courses are clearly indicated.

General Education Outcomes appear below, with corresponding measures of student learning under each outcome

1. Communicate effectively through reading, writing, listening, and speaking

  • interpret texts critically
  • use writing to create and clarify meaning
  • write in varied rhetorical modes, poetic forms and voices
  • use writing and oral communication to connect prior knowledge to disciplinary discourse
  • apply principles of critical listening to evaluate information
  • speak clearly, accurately, and coherently in several modes of delivery

2. Use analytical reasoning to identify issues or problems and evaluate evidence in order to make informed decisions

  • distinguish the problem or question from a proposed solution or answer
  • differentiate between facts, assumptions, and conclusions in the formulation of a proposed solution or answer
  • evaluate the quality of evidence
  • describe and compare the way questions, issues, or problems are formulated within various fields of study

3. Reason quantitatively and mathematically as required in their fields of interest and in everyday life

  • identify problems that need a mathematical solution, and use computational methods in the mathematics applicable in everyday life
  • use the language, notation, and inductive and deductive methods of mathematics to formulate quantitative ideas and patterns
  • use mathematics appropriate to specific fields of study
  • estimate when doing mathematical calculations
  • employ technology to collect, process, and present mathematical information
  • describe mathematical, statistical and probabilistic models and methods, and identify how they are used to obtain knowledge
  • organize and interpret data and use the data to draw conclusions

4. Use information management and technology skills effectively for academic research and lifelong learning

  • determine the extent of information needed for a research question, problem or issue
  • access needed information effectively and efficiently
  • evaluate information and its sources critically and assimilate selected information
  • use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose
  • demonstrate an understanding of the economic, legal, social, and ethical issues surrounding the use of information and information technology
  • employ technology in research and fields of interest
  • identify the role of technology and its impact on the individual, society and the environment

5. Integrate knowledge and skills in their program of study

  • create coherent, documented essays, presentations, or solutions to problems based on gathering, analyzing, and comparing evidence from more than one perspective
  • demonstrate critical and creative thought by producing new arguments, art or solutions to complex problems
  • analyze and compare evidence to support/refute different points of view on a particular topic
  • complete sequential courses that use knowledge and skills from a previous course to master the higher level course
  • complete a culminating assignment in a capstone course

6. Differentiate and make informed decisions about issues based on multiple value systems

  • identify the key elements of issues and analyze them from the perspectives of multiple value systems
  • identify values and their origins in culture, religion, philosophy, political, social or economic theory
  • differentiate ethical and non-ethical elements in arguments and/or behavior
  • distinguish facts from values in issues
  • apply varying values or ethical principles and approaches to respond to questions, dilemmas, or problems and describe alternate outcomes

7. Work collaboratively in diverse groups directed at accomplishing learning objectives

  • work in groups to accomplish learning tasks and reach common goals
  • demonstrate interpersonal skills and accountability in working in diverse groups
  • design and complete a group project
  • write or make a presentation based on group work

8. Use historical or social sciences perspectives to examine formation of ideas, human behavior, social institutions, or social processes

  • use historical facts to provide context for understanding information
  • apply discipline-specific methods to retrieve information
  • apply discipline-specific methods to reconstruct the historical past
  • interpret information to analyze historical events
  • use social sciences concepts to analyze human behavior
  • discuss social institutions from a historical or social sciences perspective
  • identify social processes in everyday life

9. Employ concepts and methods of the natural and physical sciences to make informed judgments

  • describe fundamental concepts in a field of science
  • explain and demonstrate the process of scientific inquiry
  • discuss the role of science and its impact on the individual, society and the environment

10. Apply aesthetic and intellectual criteria in the evaluation or creation of works in the humanities or the arts

  • analyze and evaluate literary works
  • analyze and evaluate works of art
  • perform or create artistic works

 

 

Pathways Common Core

The Pathways common core consists of a “required” core of 12 credits and a “flexible” core of 18 credits. The required core is divided into three categories, and the flexible core is divided into five categories.  Specific requirements for each category are indicated below.

The required core consists of 12 credits, as follows:

English composition (6 credits)
Mathematical and quantitative reasoning (3 credits)
Life and physical sciences (3 credits)

The flexible core consists of 18 credits: six 3-credit liberal arts and sciences courses, with at least one course from each of the following five areas and no more than two courses in any discipline or interdisciplinary field:

World cultures and global issues (3 credits)
U.S. experience in its diversity (3 credits)
Creative expression (3 credits)
Individual and society (3 credits)
Scientific world (3 credits)
One additional course from the flexible core

Student learning outcomes by core category

I. Required Core

A. English Composition

A student will:

  • Read and listen critically and analytically, including identifying an argument’s major assumptions and assertions and evaluating its supporting evidence.
  • Write clearly and coherently in varied, academic formats (such as formal essays, research papers, and reports) using standard English and appropriate technology to critique and improve one’s own and others’ texts.
  • Demonstrate research skills using appropriate technology, including gathering, evaluating, and synthesizing primary and secondary sources.
  • Support a thesis with well-reasoned arguments, and communicate persuasively across a variety of contexts, purposes, audiences, and media.
  • Formulate original ideas and relate them to the ideas of others by employing the conventions of ethical attribution and citation.

B. Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning

A student will:

  • Interpret and draw appropriate inferences from quantitative representations, such as formulas, graphs, or tables.
  • Use algebraic, numerical, graphical, or statistical methods to draw accurate conclusions and solve mathematical problems.
  • Represent quantitative problems expressed in natural language in a suitable mathematical format.
  • Effectively communicate quantitative analysis or solutions to mathematical problems in written or oral form.
  • Evaluate solutions to problems for reasonableness using a variety of means, including informed estimation.
  • Apply mathematical methods to problems in other fields of study.

C. Life and Physical Sciences

A student will:

  • Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a life or physical science.
  • Apply the scientific method to explore natural phenomena, including hypothesis development, observation, experimentation, measurement, data analysis, and data presentation.
  • Use the tools of a scientific discipline to carry out collaborative laboratory investigations.
  • Gather, analyze, and interpret data and present it in an effective written laboratory or fieldwork report.
  • Identify and apply research ethics and unbiased assessment in gathering and reporting scientific data.

II. Flexible Core

For all Flexible Core courses, students will:

  • Gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view.
  • Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically.
  • Produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions.

A. World Cultures and Global Issues

A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will:

  • Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring world cultures or global issues, including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications, cultural studies, economics, ethnic studies, foreign languages (building on previous language acquisition), geography, history, political science, sociology, and world literature.
  • Analyze culture, globalization, or global cultural diversity, and describe an event or process from more than one point of view.
  • Analyze the historical development of one or more non-U.S. societies.
  • Analyze the significance of one or more major movements that have shaped the world’s societies.
  • Analyze and discuss the role that race, ethnicity, class, gender, language, sexual orientation, belief, or other forms of social differentiation play in world cultures or societies.
  • Speak, read, and write a language other than English, and use that language to respond to cultures other than one’s own.

B. U.S. Experience in its Diversity

A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will:

  • Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring the U.S. experience in its diversity, including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications, cultural studies, economics, history, political science, psychology, public affairs, sociology, and U.S. literature.
  • Analyze and explain one or more major themes of U.S. history from more than one informed perspective.
  • Evaluate how indigenous populations, slavery, or immigration have shaped the development of the United States.
  • Explain and evaluate the role of the United States in international relations.
  • Identify and differentiate among the legislative, judicial, and executive branches of government and analyze their influence on the development of U.S. democracy.
  • Analyze and discuss common institutions or patterns of life in contemporary U.S. society and how they influence, or are influenced by, race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, belief, or other forms of social differentiation.

C. Creative Expression

A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will:

  • Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring creative expression, including, but not limited to, arts, communications, creative writing, media arts, music, and theater.
  • Analyze how arts from diverse cultures of the past serve as a foundation for those of the present, and describe the significance of works of art in the societies that created them.
  • Articulate how meaning is created in the arts or communications and how experience is interpreted and conveyed.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the skills involved in the creative process.
  • Use appropriate technologies to conduct research and to communicate.

D. Individual and Society

A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will:

  • Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring the relationship between the individual and society, including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications, cultural studies, history, journalism, philosophy, political science, psychology, public affairs, religion, and sociology.
  • Examine how an individual’s place in society affects experiences, values, or choices.
  • Articulate and assess ethical views and their underlying premises.
  • Articulate ethical uses of data and other information resources to respond to problems and questions.
  • Identify and engage with local, national, or global trends or ideologies, and analyze their impact on individual or collective decision-making.

E. Scientific World

A course in this area must meet at least three of the following additional learning outcomes. A student will:

  • Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring the scientific world, including, but not limited to: computer science, history of science, life and physical sciences, linguistics, logic, mathematics, psychology, statistics, and technology-related studies.
  • Demonstrate how tools of science, mathematics, technology, or formal analysis can be used to analyze problems and develop solutions.
  • Articulate and evaluate the empirical evidence supporting a scientific or formal theory.
  • Articulate and evaluate the impact of technologies and scientific discoveries on the contemporary world, such as issues of personal privacy, security, or ethical responsibilities.
  • Understand the scientific principles underlying matters of policy or public concern in which science plays a role.

 

 

Pathways: Your Guide to the Common Core

The Pathways Common Core is the new general education requirement in all CUNY colleges.

Totaling 30 transfer credits for Associate in Arts (AA) or Associate in Science (AS) degree programs, the common core will satisfy 30 credits of general education requirements at any college in CUNY. The remaining credits in degree programs will be satisfied by the "major" requirements and electives.

The 30-credit common core is divided into two categories: required and flexible.

The required core consists of: The flexible core consists of:
(I.A)   English Composition (6 credits) (II.A)   World Cultures and Global Issues (3 credits)
(I.B)   Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning (3 credits) (II.B)   U.S. and Its Diversity (3 credits)
(I.C)   Life and Physical Sciences (3 credits) (II.C)   Creative Expression (3 credits)
  (II.D)   Individual and Society (3 credits)
  (II.E)   Scientific World (3 credits)
  One additional course from the flexible core (3 credits)

Click on a category to view the lists of courses from which you may choose. To satisfy the common core requirements for Associate in Arts (AA) or Associate in Science (AS) degree programs, you must satisfy the credit requirements in all categories above.

Students in Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degree programs will complete only a portion of the common core requirements described above, according to the specific requirements of the program; consult an academic adviser.

Students who wish to opt into the Pathways curriculum should meet with an academic adviser.

Major Gateway Courses as of 3/28/13