Pathways

(II.D) Individual and Society (3 credits)

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
A survey of peoples and cultures, past and present, from many parts of the world. The student is introduced to the study of humankind through the four-discipline approach: sociocultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, physical anthropology, and archeology. Critical issues concerning human behavior are explored, such as the ecological crisis or the clash of traditional and modern values in today’s world.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
This course focuses on the construction of gender and sexuality across a wide range of cultures, exploring the role of kinship, religion, politics, and economics in the construction of gender roles, sexual practices, family arrangements, as well as gender and sexual identities and desires. This course confronts commonly-held assumptions about gender and sexuality, as it explores the diversity of gender and sexuality across cultures and historical eras, paying particular attention to the social conditions, ideologies and power-structures that inform people’s lives across cultures and societies.

3 class hours 3 credits
Offered as needed
 Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
This course is an introductory survey of the American criminal justice system with a view to its social and institutional context and its structure and functioning. The course provides an overview of the foundations and components of the criminal justice system, including (substantive and procedural) criminal law, police, courts and corrections. The main emphasis will be placed on the criminal justice process and how the various institutions of criminal justice interact. Key issues will be addressed as they arise at different stages of the process, such as the conflict between crime control and due process, and conflicts related to, for example, gender, class and ethnicity. This course will satisfy the Social Sciences elective requirement for all QCC degree programs.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisites: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
An introduction to the study of crime. Focuses on theories and research concerning the nature, causes, treatment and prevention of crime. This course will satisfy the Social Sciences elective requirement for all QCC degree programs.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
A study of factors determining national output, income, employment, and prices; the impact of government spending, taxation, and monetary policy; the banking system; economic growth; international trade.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
A study of the determination of prices and the distribution of income under various market conditions; government intervention in the market; a comparison of different types of economic systems.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisites: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
The labor force and the market for labor; theory of wage determination; employment and unemployment, including structural unemployment; trade unions and collective bargaining; the role of management and unions; emphasis on practical problems of labor-management relations, labor legislation, and public policy.

3 class hours 3 credits
Offered as needed Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the English Placement Test
Principles of economics applied to contemporary economic issues, such as inflation and unemployment, urban affairs and discrimination, poverty and welfare programs, externalities and taxation policies, budget deficits and national debt, and international aid and trade. This course is issue-oriented, rather than technically-oriented, and is designed for students who want to familiarize themselves with contemporary national and international economic issues and concerns.

3 class hours 3 credits
Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: ENGL101 (OR ENGL103)
This course will analyze the political, economic, social, cultural, religious, and gender history of the European Renaissance, from approximately 1300 to 1650. The class will focus on the start of the Renaissance in Italy, examine the spread of the Renaissance into Northern Europe, explore the issues involved in new overseas encounters, as well as discuss the religious upheaval of the Reformation and Wars of Religion. A common theme will be grounding larger ideas associated with the Renaissance in the context of the social and cultural lives of men and women throughout European society. The readings for the class will focus on both primary and secondary sources.

3 class hours 3 credits
Pre-requisite or Co-requisite: ENGL101 (OR ENGL103)
A study of the origins, events, results of and reactions to the Holocaust. Among topics discussed are: the sources of anti-Semitism found in antiquity, the Middle Ages, and early modern Europe; racism in the nineteenth century, the development of the modern German state; the rise of Nazism, the process of genocide, the ghetto, Jewish resistance, and Christian efforts to aid the Jews; the world’s reaction to the Holocaust; the effects on the survivors and their children; the literature of and the literary responses to the Holocaust and historical parallels. Readings include texts and literary and historical sources; films and eyewitness testimony are a significant part of the course.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Fundamental philosophic problems presented through the study of several major philosophical writings, such as those of Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Kant, Hume, Mill, and Whitehead.

3 class hours 3 credits
Offered as needed Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Central concepts in religious thought, such as God, faith, and immortality; problems of religious knowledge and revelation. Problems connected with the relation of theology and philosophy discussed with reference to selected medieval, modern, and contemporary texts.

3 class hours 3 credits
Offered as needed Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Basic concepts and problems of ethics. Nature of values, virtue, moral judgment, and obligation considered and illustrated through writings of the major philosophers of the Western tradition, including Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Spinoza, Kant, Moore, and Stevenson.

3 class hours 3 credits
Offered as needed Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
A consideration of the ethical implications of modern medical research and practice. Topics include professional versus universal ethics, the rights of patients, genetic engineering, truth and information in medicine, the concept of mental illness; experimentation on human subjects and public health policy.

3 class hours 3 credits
Offered as needed Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
A consideration of the impact that computers have on society, emphasizing the effects on values produced by computerization and the responsibility that computer professionals have. Topics include: the process of ethical decision-making, privacy and confidentiality, computer crime, harassment, personal identification, checking honesty, mechanization, data secrecy, “computer” errors, computer decisions, proprietary rights, computer modeling, technological dependence, and professional codes.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE122 or BE226 or BE102 satisfactory score on the ACCUPLACER Reading or CUNY/ACT Reading Assessment Test or exemption from NYS English Regents, SAT Verbal, Bachelor's Degree or appropriate transfer credit.
A consideration of the ethical implications of modern health research and practice. Topics include professional versus universal ethics, the rights of current and future generations, Public Health measures, truth and information in science, and public health policy.
Course fulfills Humanities Requirement; see section on New York State Liberal Arts and Science Requirements, Humanities Electives.

3 class hours 3 credits
Offered as needed Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
A survey of major American thinkers from colonial times to the present. Figures such as Emerson, Thoreau, Pierce, James, Royce, C. I. Lewis and Dewey will be considered.

No description associated with this course.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Introductory analysis and description of structure and dynamics of human society; special emphasis on application of scientific methods of observation and analysis of social groups, intergroup relations, social change, social stratification, and social institutions.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisites (and/or) co-requisites: BE-122 (or BE-126) or satisfactory score on CUNY/ACT test
This course will examine “art worlds” – the social activities through which paintings, photographs, music, theatre, dance, literature and other arts are produced – from the perspective of the social sciences and related disciplines. Attention will be given to works of art, audiences, stylistic conventions, evaluative processes and systems of arts distribution. This course will also consider the impact of new technologies on the ways that art is produced and distributed and the ways that we think about and respond to new and traditional art forms.

3 class hours 3 credits
Offered as needed
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) or satisfactory score on the English Placement Exam
This course introduces students to the field of social work. The emphasis is on fundamental principles and values in a historical perspective. Students will gain an appreciation of social work services and the basic competencies needed to pursue a career in social work.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: SOCY-101
An investigation of the social, economic, political and cultural life of cities. Issues include housing, transportation, crime, the urban marketplace, fiscal governance, neighborhood revitalization, life-style and communal diversity, and the relationship of suburbs to the metropolitan core.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: SOCY-101
Offered as needed
The family as a social institution: its origins, structure, and process; social relationships and interaction patterns involved in dating, mate selection, marriage, parenthood; nature of family organization and disorganization; current trends in family structure.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: SOCY-101
Offered as needed
A study of racial and ethnic groups with emphasis on American society. Focuses on (a) nature of racial and ethnic differentiation; (b) assimilation, pluralism, and stratification as outcomes of intergroup contact; (c) the status of racial and ethnic groups in the economy, and the related issue of socioeconomic mobility; (d) the role of racial and ethnic groups in the political system.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: SOCY-101
Offered as needed
The feminine and masculine roles in contemporary society; historical, biological, and psychological traditions; sex-role differentiation in the process of socialization. Emphasis placed on the status of women in industrial society in terms of stratification, law, politics, education, the labor force, and race; contemporary social movements.

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: SOCY-101
Offered as needed
This course will introduce students to a sociological analysis of the mass media. Topics include the mass media and socialization; functionalist theory and the mass media; conflict theory and the mass media; the economics of the media industry and its influence on the products we consume; advertising; the hidden world of public relations; social life in online environments; the history of celebrity and the sociological implications of celebrity gossip.

**Courses fulfill Humanities Requirement; see section on New York State Liberal Arts and Sciences Requirements, Humanities Electives.

Campus Cultural Centers

Kupferberg Holocaust CenterOpens in a new window
Kupferberg Holocaust Resource Center and ArchivesOpens in a new window

Using the lessons of the Holocaust to educate current and future generations about the ramifications of unbridled prejudice, racism and stereotyping.

Queensborough Performing Arts CenterOpens in a new window
QPAC: Performing Arts CenterOpens in a new window

QPAC is an invaluable entertainment company in this region with a growing national reputation. The arts at QPAC continues to play a vital role in transforming lives and building stronger communities.

Queensborough Art GalleryOpens in a new window
QCC Art GalleryOpens in a new window

The QCC Art Gallery of the City University of New York is a vital educational and cultural resource for Queensborough Community College, the Borough of Queens and the surrounding communities.