Classroom Management

Rules and procedures regarding faculty rights and responsibilities in the management of the classroom.

Faculty are responsible to maintain an environment conducive to the activities of teaching and learning. Should there be some disruption in the environment of the classroom faculty are responsible to address it . If students are being in some manner disruptive they violate the following item of the Henderson Rules listed below:

Rule #1: A member of the academic community shall not intentionally obstruct and/or prevent others from the exercise of their rights. Nor shall any member interfere with the institution's educational process or facilities, or the rights of those who wish to avail themselves of any of the institution's instructional, personal, administrative, recreational, and community services.

In response to the situation and in keeping with the observance of rule#1 there are actions a faculty member must take:

1. Attempt to have the student cease the behavior that is disruptive or distracting or impeding the instructional activities through direct communication..

2. If the behavior continues call security (red phones or extension 6320) and ask them to remove the student from the classroom.

3. File a complaint regarding the incident with the Office of Student Affairs and The Student Judicial Affairs Officer.

4. Cooperate with and participate in the Student Disciplinary Procedures of the City University of New York Bylaws Governing Student Behavior. This may involve attending meetings of the Student-Faculty Disciplinary Committee concerning the complaint. Faculty are advised that they may have other faculty present with them at such meetings including officers of the PSC.

From Office of Student Affairs

Encouraging Civil Behavior in Large Classes

Handling Classroom Conflict

 

The classroom should be a place where students and faculty members feel safe .

Faculty members are responsible for the management of the classroom environment . Faculty should initially develop an atmosphere of mutual trust by providing and communicating clear and firm expectations for classroom decorum and what behaviors are unacceptable.

(If students know beforehand what types of behaviors are inappropriate, they may modify their behavior and avoid further problems. Early and consistent enforcement of established standards may prevent escalation of behavioral problems).

Communication: In the absence of clear guides to classroom behavior, some students have no idea what behaviors are inappropriate. Faculty should make clear to students (preferably both orally and in writing) that the classroom environment is a special one, with special normative behaviors. Syllabi distributed and discussed at the first class session are an important tool for communicating these precepts.

Most students appreciate having limits clearly articulated and enforced: Those limits can include: phones and beepers turned off; no leaving class for calls; a request that students visit bathrooms before or after class, not during; no talking while the instructor is talking; no sleeping; questions to be directed to the instructor; no reading of materials unrelated to the class; no use of laptop computers other than for taking notes, persistent interruption of other speakers, , NO physical threats,NO harassing behavior or personal insults, or refusal to comply with faculty direction, NO abusive, profane, intimidating or threatening language, NO moving about the classroom without authorization. etc.

No matter what you do , from time to time instructors have a student who is truly disruptive in the classroom, making it difficult or impossible for teaching to take place. The following guidelines will assist instructors in dealing with these situations from a student discipline perspective, What do you do?

I f the safety of the classroom is in jeopardy, the faculty member should immediately contact the security office (PICK UP RED PHONE). The office will dispatch appropriate peace officers to intervene in the situation. The peace officers will need as much information as possible regarding the nature, severity, and source of the threat.

Some disruptive students may have emotional or mental disorders. Although disruptive students may have emotional or mental disorders protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1973, they are expected to meet the same standards of conduct as any student.

There may be situations occurring outside of the classroom where instructors feel threatened or very uncomfortable with a student's behavior. It is important that such behavior be reported to the office of student affairs, so that appropriate interventions can be made before the situation escalates. I f, at anytime, the instructor believes the student poses a physical threat to him/her or to other students, security should be called .

I nstructors have the right to tell a student who is disrupting class to leave the class for that particular class period. In extreme cases, campus security can be called to remove the student. Instructors may not remove a student from the whole course (that is, kick him/her out for the rest of the semester) without due process .

If a student's behavior is disruptive, the faculty member should ask him/her to stop. As suggested above, the key is communication: disruptions show disrespect for the instructor, fellow students, and the educational environment. If the disruptions persist, asking a student to change seats is reasonable, as is asking him/her to leave the classroom. If necessary, Security can be called to insure that a student leaves as requested.


Judicial Affairs’ Role:

The Student Judicial Affairs office (Library Building, Room 418) interprets University regulations governing student conduct on campus and assists the Dean of Students in implementing student disciplinary procedures; protects the rights of all students; facilitates and encourages respect for all members of the College Community and for campus governance; provides learning experiences for students who participate in the judicial process; and fosters civility on campus.

No community, academic or social, can exist without rules and regulations that govern the behavior of its citizens. For this reason, the following rules, known as the Henderson Rules, were established for the governing of student behavior:

Henderson Rules:

Rule #1: A member of the academic community shall not intentionally obstruct and/or prevent others from the exercise of their rights. Nor shall any member interfere with the institution’s educational process or facilities, or the rights of those who wish to avail themselves of any of the institution’s instructional, personal, administrative, recreational, and community services.

Rule #2: Individuals are liable for failure to comply with lawful directions issued by representatives of the University/College when they are acting in their official capacity. Members of the academic community are required to show their identification cards when requested to do so by an official of the college.

Rule #3: Unauthorized occupancy of the University/College facilities or blocking access to or from such areas is prohibited. Permission from appropriate college authorities must be obtained for removal, relocation, and use of University/College equipment and/or supplies.

Rule #4: Theft from or damage to University/College premises or property, or theft of or damage to property of any person on University/College premises, is prohibited.

Rule #5: Each member of the academic community or an invited guest has the right to advocate her/his position without having to fear abuse-physical, verbal or otherwise-from others supporting conflicting points of view. Members of the community and other persons on the college grounds shall not use language or take actions reasonably likely to provoke or encourage physical violence by demonstrators, those demonstrated against, or spectators.

Rule #6: Action may be taken against any and all persons who have no legitimate reason for their presence on any campus within the University/College, or whose presence on any such campus obstructs and/or forcibly prevents others from the exercise of their rights or interferes with the institution’s educational processes or facilities, or the rights of those who wish to avail themselves of any of the institution’s instructional, personal, administrative, recreational, and community services.

Rule #7: Disorderly or indecent conduct on University/College-owned or controlled property is prohibited.

Rule #8: No individual shall have in her/his possession a rifle, shotgun, or firearm or knowingly have in her/his possession any other dangerous instrument or material that can be used to inflict bodily harm on an individual or damage upon a building or the grounds of the University/College without the written authorization of such educational institution. Nor shall any individual have in her/his possession any other instrument or material which can be used and is intended to inflict bodily harm on an individual or damage upon a building or the grounds of the University/College.

Rule #9: Any action or situation which recklessly or intentionally endangers mental or physical health or involves the forced consumption of liquor or drugs for the purpose of initiation into or affiliation with any organization is prohibited.

Rule #10: The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of illegal drugs or other controlled substances by University students or employees (in the workplace) on University/College Premises, or as part of any University/College activities is prohibited. Employees of the University must also notify the College Personnel Director of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring in the workplace not later than five (5) days after such conviction.

Rule #11: The unlawful possession, use, or distribution of alcohol by students or employees on University/College premises or as part of any University/College activities is prohibited.

Any and all violations of the Henderson Rules will be documented with the documentation sent to the Office of Student Judicial Affairs. If the charges are upheld, you shall be subject to the following range of penalties: admonition, warning, censure, disciplinary probation, restitution, suspension, expulsion, complaint to civil authorities, or ejection.

Sanctions Defined:

1. Admonition – an oral statement to the offender that she/he has violated University Rules.

2. Warning – notice to the offender, orally or in writing, that continuation or repetition of the wrongful conduct, within a period of time stated in the warning, may be cause for more severe disciplinary action.

3. Censure – written reprimand for violation of a specified regulation, including the possibility of more severe disciplinary sanction in the event of conviction for the violation of any University regulation within a period of time stated in the letter of reprimand.

4. Disciplinary Probation – exclusion from participation in privileges or extracurricular university activities as set forth in the notice of disciplinary probation for a specified period of time.

5. Restitution – reimbursement for damage to or misappropriation of property. Reimbursement may take the form of appropriate service to repair or otherwise compensate for damages.

6. Suspension – exclusion from classes and other privileges or activities as set forth in the notice of suspension for a definite period of time. If a student is suspended for more than one term, the disciplinary penalty is a University-wide sanction.

7. Expulsion – termination of student status for an indefinite period. The conditions of readmission, if any are permitted, shall be stated in the order of expulsion. If a student is expelled for more than one term, the disciplinary penalty is a University-wide sanction.

Student Judicial Affairs Procedures

Once a written complaint has been filed against a student, the following procedures will be followed:

• A Student Disciplinary Hold (DD) will be placed on the student’s record which prevents him/her from registering, forwarding transcripts and obtaining final grades. This hold will remain on the student’s record until the complaint has been resolved.

• An appointment is made with The Student Judicial Affairs Officer to discuss the complaint against the student. At this meeting, a decision will be made as to whether to prefer formal disciplinary charges.

• At this meeting, with The Student Judicial Affairs Officer, a mutual agreement resolving the complaint between the student and the officer may be reached as provided for under Section 15, Article 3, of the Student Disciplinary Procedures of the City University of New York Bylaws Governing Student Behavior.

• If an agreement is not reached, the complaint becomes a disciplinary charge and will go before the Student-Faculty Disciplinary Committee. During this meeting, the committee members will hear both sides of the disciplinary charges and will make their decision accordingly.

• If the ruling is in favor of the student who is charged, then the case is officially closed and the Student Disciplinary Hold is removed.

• If the ruling is not in favor of the student, then the student may do one of the following:

o Either he/she will abide by the committee’s decision and fulfill the sanctions that were set forth by the committee or;

o He/she can appeal to the President of the College.

• If the student does appeal to the College President then the following may be done:

o The President may in some measure modify the Student-Faculty Disciplinary Committee’s decision or

o The President will uphold the decision of the Student – Faculty Disciplinary committee.

• The student also has the right to submit a final appeal to the Chancellor City University of New York. The Chancellor’s decision is final.