(II.E)   Scientific World (3 credits)

BI 110:     Fundamentals of Life Science

3 class hours 3 credits
Students who feel they need to reinforce their science background are urged to take BI-110 either before or with the indicated courses
Presents basic concepts of the life sciences. Includes scientific measurement, the properties of matter and energy on which life is dependent, and levels of organization.
Especially recommended for those students who plan to take additional courses in the life sciences. Credit will not be given to students who have successfully completed BI-140, BI-160, BI-201, BI-301, or BI-501 prior to taking BI-110.

BI 115:     Introduction to Biology for Science Majors

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-126) or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment test
The major concepts of biology including biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and evolution are presented with an emphasis on their relevance to human biology. The course provides a foundation in hypothesis testing, experimental design, data interpretation and scientific communication needed for success in major’s Biology.

BI 120:     Evolution and Man

3 class hours 3 credits
Offered as needed.
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-126) or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment test
The principles and mechanisms of evolutionary change, including adaptation, mutation, differential reproduction, genetic drift, and speciation. The primate fossil record, hominid evolutionary trends, and the emergence of homo sapiens.

BI 140:     Principles of Biology

3 class hours 3 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-126) or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment test. Credit will not be given to students who have successfully completed BI-201.
A comprehensive approach to the interaction of living things in the biological world. Topics include the cellular basis of life, genetics, reproduction, evolution, and ecology. The laboratory experience includes dissection of selected vertebrates.

BI 201:     General Biology I

3 class hours 3 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-126) or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment test
Structure of the cell and molecular basis of life. Classical and modern genetics and “molecular biology.” Homeostasis-control mechanisms, both intracellular and intercellular. A comparative study of organ systems with emphasis on the vertebrate, using laboratory dissection of selected animals.

BI 301:     Anatomy and Physiology I

3 class hours 3 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-126) or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment test. Students may not receive credit for BI-301 without BI-302.
First semester of a one year integrated lecture and laboratory course for the study of the structure and function of the human organism. Topics include: biological chemistry, cellular ultrastructure and metabolism, tissues and organs, and a systematic study of both the anatomy and physiology of all of the organ systems of the body. Laboratory work includes mammalian dissection and physiological experiments

BI 520:     Public Health Science

3 class hours 3 laboratory hours (including field observations)
4 credits
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-226) or satisfactory scores on the CUNY ACT Assessment test
A study of how society deals with health and disease; topics include major determinants of health and disease, community health, health care delivery systems and manpower. Selected exercises in physiology and anatomy provide background needed to understand major problems in environmental health and public health. Field observations at nearby community health, environmental, and industrial facilities reinforce these concepts.

CH 103:     Chemistry and the Arts

3 class hour 3 credits
This course offers a general background in the connections between chemistry and the arts. Topics include light absorption and reflection; the nature of color; additive and subtractive color mixing; separation of mixtures; properties of paints and pigments; preservation and authentication of art objects; common chemical hazards; and the principles of photography.
Either CH 106 or a combination of CH 103 and 104 meets requirements for the A.A.S. degree in Digital Art and Design and are recommended for students in programs offered by the Art and Photography Department. These courses may not be used as part of the Mathematics or Science concentration in A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum and is not open to students who have completed CH-151, CH-152, CH-251 or CH-252.

CH 115:     Introduction to Nanoscience

3 class hours 3 credits
This course will give students an introduction to nanoscience, which is a rapidly growing field in our society. The synthesis of nanomaterials, the tools used to characterize these materials (Electron Microscopy (SEM/TEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and UV-Vis spectroscopy), and societal impacts of nanomaterials/technology (such as, ethical, legal, environmental implications) will be covered. Students will select a nanomaterial of interest and also do a term paper and presentation.

CH 127:     Introductory College Chemistry

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours, 4.5 credits
This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence intended to provide students with basic knowledge of general chemistry. The second semester introduces organic chemistry (CH-128). Topics include units of measurement and dimensional analysis, elements and compounds, atomic structure, chemical bonding and chemical reactions, properties of solutions and chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, physical states and gas laws, intra- and intermolecular forces, and nuclear chemistry. In the laboratory component, students apply the scientific method to explore natural phenomena using basic experimental techniques.
The course is a requirement for the B.S. or B.A. in Nursing, Nutrition, and other Allied Health Professions. It also satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the A.S. in Health Sciences, A.A. in Liberal Arts and Sciences (non-science concentration) and other non-science majors. This course is not open to students who have completed CH-151, CH-152, CH-251, and CH-252.

CH 128:     Introductory Organic Chemistry

Prerequisites: CH-120, CH-127 or CH-151
3 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours, 4.5 credits
 This course is the second of a two-semester sequence and is intended to provide a brief, but thorough introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. The major functional groups such as hydrocarbons, alcohols, amines and carbonyl compounds are studied with some emphasis on nomenclature, reactions, and stereochemistry. Several aspects of organic chemistry related to biochemistry are also stressed including units on amino acids, enzymes, carbohydrates and lipids. The laboratory introduces students to the various synthetic methods for making organic compounds, as well as to purification techniques like distillation, recrystallization and extraction.
This course is recommended for students in Nursing and others planning to pursue careers in the Allied Health fields. It may be used as a preparation for CH-251, but may not be substituted for CH-251 and is not open to students who have already completed CH-251 or CH-252.

CH 151:     General Chemistry I

Prerequisite: MA-119 and MA-121 or satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Test. Students who have not had high school chemistry are strongly advised to take CH-127 prior to CH-151.
3 class hours, 1 recitation hour, 3 laboratory hours, 4.5 credits
This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence that provides students with a fundamental knowledge of the modern theory in general and inorganic chemistry. It covers topics that are essential to many disciplines in science and technology, and the health professions, with an emphasis on developing problem-solving skills. Topics include matter and energy; chemical nomenclature; mass relationships and stoichiometry; reactions in aqueous solutions; gas laws and kinetic molecular theory; atomic structure and quantum theory; periodicity of elements; chemical bonding and molecular structure; states of matter and intermolecular forces; properties of solutions; and colligative properties. Laboratory work provides training in common experimental methods and hands-on application of theory. The students in Honors classes will attend scientific seminars and write a short paper.

CH 152:     General Chemistry II2

Prerequisite: CH-151
3 class hours, 1 recitation hour, 3 laboratory hours, 4.5 credits
This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence that provides students with a fundamental knowledge of the modern theory in general and inorganic chemistry. It covers topics that are essential to many disciplines in science and technology, and the health professions, with an emphasis on developing problem-solving skills. Topics include enthalpy, entropy, and free energy; chemical kinetics; chemical equilibrium in gaseous and aqueous systems; properties and equilibria of acids and bases; buffers and acid-base titrations; solubility and complex ion equilibria; qualitative analysis; electrochemistry and redox reactions; and an introduction to nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work provides training in common experimental methods and hands-on application of theory. The students in Honors classes will give 10-15 minute oral presentations on topics and concepts chosen from the course material. This course makes extensive use of computers and requires the development of scientific communication skills.

CH 251:     Organic Chemistry I3

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 4 laboratory hours
5 credits
Corequisite: CH-152, by permission of the Department
The relationship between structure and properties of organic compounds is discussed, with emphasis on reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and synthesis. Laboratory work involves preparation, isolation, and identification of organic compounds.

CH 252:     Organic Chemistry II3

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 4 laboratory hours
5 credits Prerequisite: CH-251.
A sequel to CH-251; this course develops the relationship between properties and structure of organic compounds in greater detail. In addition, current syntheses, modern mechanisms of organic reactions, and spectroscopic identification of compounds are discussed. The main families of organic compounds of biochemical interest and their typical reactions are studied. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, purification, and identification of organic compounds, as well as organic qualitative analysis including IR spectroscopy.

CS 100:     Introduction to Computers and Programming

3 class hours 3 credits Prerequisite: MA-010, or satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Test, Level I
A survey of topics in computer science including history, hardware components, software applications and the use of computers in society. Use of software applications. Introduction of computer programming using a high level language.

CS 101:     Algorithmic Problem Solving I

3 class hours 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Corequisite: MA-441
Primitive data types; single and multidimensional arrays; strings; control structures; basic I/O; subprograms and parameter passing; references; scope; introduction to recursion; designing, coding, debugging and documenting programs in a high level language.

CS 201:     Computer Organization and Assembly Language

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 1 lab hour 4 credits
Prerequisite: CS-101 with a grade of C or better and MA-441
Principles of computer design and implementation. Instruction set architecture and register-transfer level execution; storage formats; binary data encoding; bus structures; assembly language programming.

CS 203:     Algorithmic Problem Solving II

3 class hours 2 recitation hours 4 credits
Prerequisite: MA-441 and C or better in CS-101
User defined data types, pointers and linked lists, ADT’s, stacks, queues, recursion, searching and simple sorting, elementary memory management. Object oriented problem solving.

ET 570:     Creating Smartphone Apps

3 Class Hours 3 Credits
This course introduces the use and features of smartphones in modern life and how to create working applications. Students will create apps using existing modules and building blocks. No prior programming knowledge is necessary. After this initial experience, basics of the Java programming language will be introduced along with a minimum of XML programming to introduce the student to the needs of more advanced apps. Software development kits (SDK), along with the development environment will also be covered. In addition, students will have the opportunity to distribute apps into the Marketplace.

ET 575:     Introduction to C++ Programming Design and Impleme

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite and/or corequisites: None
This foundation course provides a general understanding of the use and development of computer software applications in fields such as science, mathematics, and business using a high level computer language. The course will concentrate on assessing the practical requirements of a software package and developing applications in C++, which is a high level computer language that teaches the basic skills necessary for implementing it in a variety of real world applications. Topics include the analysis and use of concepts such as: primitive data types and their operators, basic I/O, control statements, decision making, looping, subprograms, arrays, strings and computer ethics. Each student will have a computer platform at his/her disposal from which he/she will design, develop, implement and test programs, while evaluating the interactions between a user and the computer.

ET 821:     Computers in the Modern Society

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisites (and/or) corequisites: none
In the last three or four decades, computers have gone from a luxury owned only by large organizations, to the point where they surround us on all sides. Society has adapted to their ubiquity, and we can hardly imagine life without them. This course examines their effect on modern life. We look at how they work, what they do, where they can be used, what they are capable of, what happens when they fail, and how they are used – and misused. Among the many topics included are gaming, entertainment, communications and social networking, encryption and cryptography, data security, piracy and copyright, governmental regulation and related issues. Class demonstrations are used to illustrate the major points.

ET 880:     Science and Technology in Modern Life

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisites (and/or) co-requisites: none
Basic scientific principles that underlie and enable the conveniences and necessities we take for granted in our modern society will be introduced and studied. The science and technology underlying the electrical grid, power generation, automobile, aircraft, television, cell phones, solid state electronics, cat scans, MRI, molecular medicine, DNA, fission and fusion, LED lighting, photovoltaics, nano-materials, stem cells, heat pumps, fuel cells, artificial intelligence, robotics, GPS, WiFi, internet, sonar, radar, microprocessor and the PC.

GE 101:     Physical Geology

3 class hours 3 laboratory hours 4 credits
Earth materials and landscapes are studied to formulate the principles of geology. Laboratory studies include minerals, rocks, soils, and topographic maps. A field trip to the American Museum of Natural History is a course requirement.

GE 105:     Gems and Semi Precious Stones

3 class hours 3 credits
Gems and semi-precious stones are classified and their origins are explained. The economic, industrial, and aesthetic values of gem materials are related to their physical characteristics. The physical properties of gems and gen simulants are described. A trip to the American Museum of Natural History is a course requirement..

HE 103:     Fundamentals of Human Nutrition

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Fundamentals of Human Nutrition provides an integrated overview of the physiological requirements and functions of protein, energy, and the major vitamins and minerals that are determinants of health and diseases in human populations. Nutrient requirements under varying conditions of growth will be explored as well as calculations and computations of nutrient composition of selected food groups, and diets.

HE 105:     Human Sexuality

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: HE-101 or HE-102 (The HE-101 or HE-102 prerequisite is not required for students in the Nursing curriculum or for veterans)
Designed to assist students in developing positive and accepting attitudes and behaviors about their own sexuality and that of others throughout the life cycle. Study includes psycho-sexual development, sexual behaviors, reproductive biology, and family planning.

HE 107:     Mental Health: Understanding Your Behavior

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: HE-101 or HE-102 or SS-510. (The HE-101 or HE-102 prerequisite is not required for students in the Nursing curriculum or for veterans)
An opportunity for students to develop a better understanding of their behavior and adjustment to life situations. Attention given to personal approaches to problem-solving and evaluating available outside resources. Participation is required in at least one course-related field trip to be arranged by the instructor.

HE 108:     Health and Physical Fitness

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: HE-101 or HE-102
An inquiry to the concepts of health, physical fitness, physical performance and wellness. Factors such as nutrition, body composition and weight control, principles of physical conditioning, physiology of exercise, and other issues related to optimal physical performance will be considered. The classroom lectures will be supplemented by laboratories and demonstrations using available gym facilities to provide the students the opportunity to assess their present state of physical fitness. The student should be able to formulate a program of self-improvement in relation to their individual goals after completion of this course of study.

MA 443:     Analytic Geometry and Calculus III

4 class hours 1 recitation hour 4 credits
Prerequisite: MA-442 (with a grade of C or better).
Continuation of MA-442 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus II); polar coordinates; solid analytic geometry and vectors; partial derivatives; multiple integrals. Students will develop problem solving skills and construct mathematical models in the computer laboratory using software such as MAPLE, DERIVE, CONVERGE, and MATHCAD.

MA 451:     Differential Equations

4 class hours 1 recitation hour 4 credits
Prerequisite: MA-443 (with a grade of C or better)
Methods of solving ordinary differential equations with physics, engineering and computer science applications; solutions by series. Students will solve application problems using software such as MAPLE.

MA 461:     Linear Algebra

4 class hours 1 recitation hour 4 credits
Prerequisite: MA-442 (with a grade of C or better)
Vector spaces; systems of linear equations; determinants; linear operations; matrices; inner product spaces; eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Students will solve application problems using software such as MAPLE.

PH 101:     Principles of Physics

3 class hours 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Presents a modern overview of the world around us, from the sub-miniature world inside an atomic nucleus to the vastness of outer space. Investigates selected subjects of interest to modern man in depth and detail. An understanding of physical principles is the major goal. Minimal use of mathematics. This course, or its equivalent, is required for elementary education majors at The City College.

PH 120:     Introduction to Meteorology

3 hours 3 credits
Introduces students to Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences. The course presents basic scientific principles and how they apply to the atmosphere and oceans. Fulfills the science requirement without lab (or with lab if taken in conjunction with PH-121).

PH 123:     Natural Hazards

3 class hours 3 credits
This course examines natural hazards and their evidence, including statistics, underlying scientific principles, current prediction skills, and planning solutions for risk assessment and management. Topics include the external energy flow from the Sun; Earth’s energy flow causing wild fires, earthquakes, volcanoes, tornados, and tsunami; gravity effect on landscape features such as snow, ice, and flooding; and possible impacts by asteroids and comets having major effects on life.

PH 124:     Global Warming

3 class hours 3 credits
The scientific processes in climate change, climate modeling, and global warming are examined with the use of minimal mathematics in terms of the principles and evidence in science. Major topics include processes involved in the climate system, El Nino and year-to-year climate prediction, climate model and numerical examples, greenhouse effect and climate feedbacks, natural climate variations, and climate model scenarios for global warming and possible solutions.

PH 129:     How Things Work

3 class hours 3 credits
This course focuses on how things work as it applies to everyday situations. It introduces scientific properties in the context of everyday objects and current technology. Topics will include how our technology works (TV, radio, microwaves, refrigerators, cell phones, GPS), why things look, sound, and feel the way they do, the science of electricity, heat, food, motion, and so forth. Numerical estimation and unit conversion will be covered as well.

PH 133:     Scientific Explorations of Scientific Literature

3 class hours 3 credits
Scientific Explorations of Science Fiction Literature examines the scientific basis of natural processes described in science fiction literature. Some science fiction literature involves valid scientific descriptions of nature. The descriptions of natural processes can be used to understand our natural world in a way that a textbook cannot. In addition, topics that relate to futuristic ideas can be used to discuss the ethics of scientific exploration. A notable example of scientific literature is Arthur C. Clarke’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, which can be used to explain many concepts in astronomy and natural science, including planetary science, the life cycle of stars, gravity, the natural motion of objects, and visual effects, as well as interdisciplinary topics such as life support and artificial intelligence.

PH 140:     Acoustics: The Physics of Sound

3 lecture hours 1 recitation hour 2 lab hours 4 credits
Corequisite: MA-321 or MA-119 and MA-121 or MA-114 or the equivalent
Traveling waves and standing waves, energy, sound intensity, interaction of sound and materials, methods of sounds production by musical instruments, room acoustics, interference, human ear response to sound, magnetism and induction as they relate to audio equipment, microphones, speakers, pick-ups. This course is intended to satisfy the physics requirement for the Music Production Degree but is open to all majors.

PH 201:     General Physics I

3 class hours 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisite: MA-114 or MA-119 and MA-121 or the equivalent, or satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Test, Level II.
A beginning course for technology students. Topics include units, vectors, equilibrium, linear motion, Newton’s laws, circular motion, angular motion, momentum, and fluid motion. Emphasis is on applications. A working knowledge of simple algebra is assumed.

PH 202:     General Physics II

3 class hours 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisite: PH-201 (with a grade of C or better)
Second semester of PH-201, 202 sequence. Topics include vibration and wave motion, electrostatics, electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, optics and topics in modern physics.

PH 240:     Computerized Physical Measurement Using Graphical

2 lecture hours 3 laboratory hours 3 credits
Prerequisites: Permission of the department based on one laboratory course in science or technology; MA-114, MA-119 and MA-121 or the equivalent; and ET-501, PH-303, CIS-101 or the equivalent
Students will design applications with a graphical programming language such as LabVIEWTM and use the computer for measurement and automation. Topics include: theory of measurement, physical principles of transducers and their use in measurement, instrument control, data acquisition, virtual instrumentation, signal/data conditioning and analysis.

PH 301:     College Physics I

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisite: MA-119 and MA-121 or MA-114 or equivalent or permission of the department
PH-301 and 302 are designed for students who need or want two semesters of noncalculus physics, such as those planning careers in optometry, dentistry, and other medically-related fields. Topics include conservation laws, vectors, laws of motion, linear and angular momentum, energy, gravitation, and thermodynamics.

PH 302:     College Physics II

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisite: PH-301 (with a grade of C or better)
Second-semester course following PH-301. Topics include electro-magnetism, vibrations wave phenomena and radiation, and modern physics.

PH 311:     College Physics A

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 2 laboratory hours
4 credits Prerequisite: MA-441 or equivalent or permission of Department
First part of a two-semester introduction to physics with applications to biology, primarily for students majoring in biology or planning careers in optometry, dentistry, and other medically related fields. Topics include conservation laws, vectors, laws of motion, linear and angular momentum, energy, gravitation, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Strong algebra skills and knowledge of the ideas of calculus are required.

PH 312:     College Physics B

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 2 laboratory hours
4 credits Prerequisite or Corequisite: PH-311
Second part of a two-semester introduction to physics with applications to biology, primarily for students majoring in biology or planning careers in optometry, dentistry, and other medically related fields. Topics include electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, and radiation phenomena. Strong algebra skills and knowledge of the ideas of calculus are required.

PH 411:     Calculus Physics I

2 class hours 2 recitation hours 2 laboratory hours 3.5 credits
Prerequisite: MA-440, or the equivalent Corequisite: MA-441
Fundamental principles of mechanics; includes kinematics, classical laws of motion, statics, conservation laws, work, mechanical energy, and simple harmonic motion.

PH 412:     Calculus Physics II

2 class hours 2 recitation hours 2 laboratory hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: PH-411 (with a grade of C or better)
Corequisite: MA-442
Fundamentals of heat, waves, and optics; includes heat transfer, first and second laws of thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases; nature of light, geometrical and physical optics; optical instruments; sound.

PH 413:     Calculus Physics III

2 class hours 2 recitation hours 2 laboratory hours
3.5 credits Prerequisite: PH-411 (with a grade of C or better) Corequisite: MA-443
Electricity and magnetism. Includes Coulomb’s law, electric field and potential, elementary DC and AC circuits; magnetic fields, induction, Maxwell’s equations.

PH 416:     Thermodynamics

4 class hours 4 credits Prerequisite: PH-412 and MA-443
Introduction to concepts and definitions of thermodynamics. Temperature and Zeroth Law. Work, internal energy, heat, the First Law and applications. Second Law, reversibility and irreversibility, Carnot cycles, entropy, thermodynamic state variables. Power and refrigeration cycles. Chemical equilibrium, chemical potentials, phase rules.

PH 440:     Modern Physics

4 class hours 4 credits Prerequisites: PH-412 and PH-413
Introduction to atomic and nuclear physics, relativity, space physics, and elementary particle physics. Considerable mathematics used.

PSYC 101:     Psychology

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Introduction to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Topics include research methods, biological bases of brain and mind, sensation-perception, sleep and states of consciousness, learning-memory, development, cognition-intelligence, motivation-emotion, personality, abnormal psychology-therapy, and social psychology. Research findings and principles related to everyday life.

PSYC 125:     Psychology of Personal Adjustment

3 class hours 3 credits Prerequisite: PSYC-101
Offered in Fall
Focus is on personal adjustment as an ongoing process of the normal individual. An examination of individual adjustment in terms of the psychological, developmental, and sociocultural dimensions of everyday living. A major concern is the practical application of psychological principles to the enhancement of personal adjustment. Main topics include the origins of adjustment, adjustment and identity, individual growth and change, social adjustment, and problems of adjustment.

PSYC 215:     Child Development

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: PSYC-101
The goal of this course is to enable students to acquire a knowledge base of child development. Consideration of developmental issues particular to special needs youngsters will also be addressed. Students will examine the central emotional, cognitive, and social issues for each developmental period during childhood. Cultural, socio-economic, and historical influences on development will be integrated within the course.

PSYC 220:     Human Growth and Development

3 class hours 3 credits Prerequisite: PSYC-101
A study of the changes in behavior and mental processes across the life-span and the biological, psychological, social and cultural factors influencing those changes.

PSYC 230:     Abnormal Psychology

3 class hours 3 credits Prerequisite: PSYC-101
Examines abnormal behavior with an emphasis on the classification of, causes of, and treatments for mental disorders. Focuses on major mental disorders including: anxiety, somatoform, and dissociative disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenias, personality disorders, substance-related disorders, sexual disorders, and cognitive disorders.

PSYC 240:     Social Psychology

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: PSYC-101
An examination of the behavior of individuals in relation to society. Topics include the self in social context, interpersonal relationships, group behavior attitudes, communication, and attraction.

PSYC 250:     Personality3

3 class hours 3 credits Prerequisite: PSYC-101
Explores major theoretical perspectives on personality such as psychodynamic, trait, biological, humanistic, behavioral-social learning, and cognitive approaches. Presents relevant research on personality structure, normal and abnormal development, and assessment, including self-assessment through standardized personality tests.

PSYC 255:     The Psychology of Women

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: PSYC-101
A critical examination of theories of female personality and behavior. Emphasis is placed on the data concerning women’s physical, cognitive, emotional and social characteristics and the biological, developmental, and social forces shaping them. Issues related to health, discrimnation, and victimization also discussed.

PSYC 260:     Psychological Disorders of Childhood

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: PSYC-101
This course is a survey of the major psychological disorders in infants, toddlers, children, and adolescents with a focus on diagnosis, assessment, etiology, and treatment. These disorders include anxiety disorders, mood disorders, conduct disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, learning and communication disorders, eating disorders, habit disorders, attachment disorders, autism and other pervasive developmental disorders, childhood psychoses, and sensory-motor disabilities. Emphasis is placed on the developmental context of the disorders and on the use of multiple theoretical perspectives on the disorders.

PSYC 270:     The Psychology of Aging

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: PSYC-101
A multifaceted approach to the study of the aging process, including the effects of aging on learning, intelligence, personality, and emotional development. The role and status of the elderly person with respect to the family and society. A cross-cultural examination of the situation of the aged person and an evaluation of the utility and limitations of institutional care.

PSYC 290:     States of Consciousness

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: PSYC-101
Examines theory and research related to altered states of consciousness. Topics include sleep, dreaming, hypnosis, biofeedback, meditation, and parapsychology in its various manifestations.

 

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