(II.B)   U.S. and Its Diversity (3 credits)

ANTH 140:     North American Indians

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
An introduction to the discipline of anthropology while focusing on the diversity of native American cultures throughout their long history in North America. Cultures to be analyzed include the Arctic, Plains, Eastern Woodlands, Northwest Coast, the Southwest, and the Aztec and Mayan societies. The effects of European contact on the native cultures and the problems facing American Indians today are discussed.

HI 125:     Immigration and Ethnic Groups in American History

3 class hours 3 credits Offered in Spring
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Analyzes the American immigration experience and examines various ethnic groups that came to America; depicts their pre-immigration background and the historical causes of immigration; evaluates the impact of the immigrants on American history and of America upon the immigrants. Among themes to be examined are the historical development of the ghetto and American reception of immigrants.

HI 126:     Women in America

3 class hours 3 credits Offered in Fall
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
An analysis of women in the history of American civilization. Examines the impact of changes in the economy, technology, law, culture, and society on the status of women and explores women’s perceptions of themselves. Among topics considered are the work roles of women, the historical experience of women of differing classes and ethnic groups, women and reform in the nineteenth century, the political activity of women before and after the nineteenth amendment to the Constitution, and current feminist movements.

HI 127:     Growth of American Civilization I: Colonial Period

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
The development of American civilization examined from its origins through the aftermath of the Civil War. Deals with vital political, economic, social, and cultural forces and institutions. The Revolutionary era, the Constitutional period, the Jacksonian, Civil War, and Reconstruction eras, and such developments as sectionalism, nationalism, and industrialization are surveyed. Readings include textual and original source materials.

HI 128:     Growth of American Civilization II: Reconstruction

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
The development and growth of modern American civilization examined. Emphasis is on social, political, cultural, and economic forces that have shaped the nation, concentrating on both internal developments and the roots of American expansion abroad. Themes discussed include immigration, nativism, the changing role of women, the Great Depression, the New Deal, America’s wars, the United States as a world leader, civil rights and the growth of popular cultures. Readings include textual and original source materials.

HI 129:     Recent American Civilization

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Concentration on the major forces which have shaped and influenced American life since 1945. Dynamics of our contemporary society, including the economic and cultural factors as well as the significant developments, with a view toward trying to understand how American values and the elements of a diverse nation relate to its role among other powers.

HI 135:     History of New York State

3 class hours 3 credits Offered in Spring
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Empire State from colonial times to the modern era. Analysis of the forces and conditions that have made New York the financial and cultural capital of the United States. Secondary sources are supplemented by primary sources such as maps, diaries, journals, letters and government documents.

HI 136:     African-American History

3 class hours 3 credits Offered in Spring
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Survey of major developments in the history of Africans in America from the colonial era to the present day. Themes will include changes in the legal status of Africans in America, evolving ideas about racial identity, and the politics of civil rights. Topics will include the economics of slavery, African cultural survival, and the roles of religion and family in black communities. Major events surveyed include the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Great Migration, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Power Movement, and recent changes in black America due to immigration.

PLSC 101:     American Government and Politics

3 class hours 3 credits Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Study and analysis of American government; its historical and intellectual origins and development; special consideration of its structure and operations; functions of the President, Congress, and judiciary; role of government and politics in modern industrial society.

PLSC 180:     American Foreign Policy

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
An intense examination of American foreign policy, including the major theories concerning the sources and conduct of this policy; internal and external determinants of foreign policy; foreign policy-making processes; the substance of U.S. foreign policy; and execution and impact of this policy on other nation-states.

SP 211:     Speech Communication

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: satisfactory completion of Speech Placement Test, or successful completion of SP-020, or SP-005 and/or SP-006
This course introduces students to the principles and practices of contemporary forms of public speaking in the United States. Selecting topics from current U.S. society and or American history, students will perform research and gather credible evidence from both primary and secondary U.S. sources to create both informative and persuasive speeches. Students are also asked to employ methods taught in this course to analyze both historical and contemporary U.S. rhetoric for authenticity, organizational structure, target audiences and effectiveness as a means of persuasion or communication. Enrollment limited to 22 students.

 

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