(II.A)   World Cultures and Global Issues (3 credits)

ANTH 130:     Cultures and Peoples of Asia

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
An introduction to the discipline of anthropology while surveying selected Asian peoples and cultures – China, Korea, Japan, the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia, Central Asia, and Mongolia. Traditional and contemporary patterns of religion, healing, marriage and family life, economy and social stratification are analyzed. The role of Asia in the biological and cultural evolution of humankind is traced.

ANTH 150:     Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
An introduction to the discipline of anthropology while surveying the peoples and cultures of the Caribbean. Topics include language, economy, religion, healing, kinship, and ethnic relations. The institutions of slavery and the consequences of European domination are examined.

ANTH 160:     Anthropology of Health and Healing

3 class hours 3 credits Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
This course offers an overview of health, illness and healing in cross-cultural perspective. Topics covered include cultural interpretations of health and illness, traditional healing practices, and important global health concerns. Students will become acquainted with medical anthropology methods and will learn anthropological approaches to solving health-related problems, including an examination of the ways social status, cultural meanings and economic inequalities influence health and illness. The course draws primarily on work from the fields of medical anthropology, sociology and public health but will also turn to more exploratory modes such as memoirs and expressive writing to gain a deeper, more personal understanding of the meaning and experience of health and illness in individual lives.

ECON 235:     International Economics

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: ECON-101 or ECON-102
Offered as needed
An examination of the basic economic principles and policies underlying international trade and finance. Topics include: current U.S. trade policies; the flow of trade; exchange rates; the plight of less developed nations; economic cooperation among major industrialized nations with particular emphasis on U.S.-Japanese-European relations.

HI 110:     Introduction to Ancient Civilization

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
A historical survey of the development of ideas and institutions in Ancient China, India, the Near East, Greece, and Rome. Emphasis is on their political, economic, social, legal, religious, cultural, and intellectual achievements. Consultation of primary sources in translation.

HI 111:     Introduction to Medieval and Early Modern Western

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
The development of Western civilization from the beginning of the Middle Ages to the French Revolution; the major political, intellectual, religious, economic, and social movements which transformed Western civilization from a medieval to a modern society. Materials drawn from texts and original sources.

HI 112:     Introduction to Modern Western Civilization

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
The development of Western civilization from the French Revolution. Major political, economic, intellectual, social, and scientific forces considered. Focus is on the impact of major ideologies – including liberalism, socialism, and nationalism, as well as the emergence of totalitarianism. Readings include textual and original source material.

HI 113:     Europe and the World Since 1945

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
A survey of Europe’s political, economic, and cultural role in the post-war world. Topics include: characteristics of modern industrialization, the politico-economic and social changes of the “Third World,” the population explosion and the depletion of natural resources, terrorism and revolution, nuclear proliferation.

HI 118:     Ancient Greek History

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
The course surveys the development of Ancient Greece from Bronze Age to the end of the Classical Period, discussing politics (for example, the origin of democracy), culture (for example, the origin of drama) and intellectual history. Reference will also be made to the influence of other advanced civilizations on Greece. Readings will be drawn from primary and secondary source material.

HI 133:     Introduction to Modern East Asian Civilizations

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
This course is a survey of the history of East Asia, and will examine the social, cultural, political, economic, and diplomatic development of the region, including China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam. Topics of discussion will include the impact of Western imperialism, strategies of modernization, the rise of nationalism, Asian communist movements, World War II, the Cold War and Post Cold War era.

HI 140:     Latin American History I: Ancient Times to Indepen

3 class hours 3 credits Offered in Fall
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
This course is a survey of Latin American and Caribbean history from pre-Columbian times through the age of exploration, conquest, and colonization. The course will examine the social, political, economic and cultural institutions of the Aztec, Mayan, and Inca civilizations as well as those of the Spanish and Portuguese, English, French, and Dutch empires. Special emphasis will be given to the conflicts between indigenous and European cultures, their fusion and the emergence of a new and distinct Latin American Civilization.

HI 141:     Latin American History II: Independence to the Pre

3 class hours 3 credits Offered in Spring
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
This course is a survey of Latin American and Caribbean history from Independence (1800) to the present. The course will focus on problems of nation-building, caudillismo, modernization, social change and cultural development. The experience of individual states will be examined, but specific emphasis will be given to events and developments that are representative of continental-wide trends.

HI 144:     Modern Economic History

3 class hours 3 credits
Offered in alternating Spring Semesters
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
History of the global economy from the development of capitalism to contemporary economic issues including finance, trade, industrialism, energy, and business organization. Readings will be drawn from primary and secondary source material.

HI 152:     Women in World History: From Prehistoric Times to

3 class hours 3 credits Offered in Spring
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
A comparative historical exploration of women’s roles in public and private life in various world societies from the Paleolithic era to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the contribution women have made to political, intellectual, economic, and social developments within diverse cultures. Topics discussed will include: male and female perceptions of sex roles and gender norms in various societies; women’s roles within the family; modes of social, economic, and political participation for women outside the family; female education, and gynecological knowledge. Readings will be drawn from a wide array of primary sources, as well as important secondary literature.

HI 153:     War and Warfare in Western History: From Gunpowder

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
The course surveys the evolution of warfare from Feudal times to the era of total war and the nuclear age. It will examine the nature of war, how it is used by the state to promote its interests, and how war impacts human society, its economy and political institutions. A number of major battles from different periods will be analyzed with a view to understanding how strategy, battle-field tactics, as well as military organization and training, change in response to new technology and weapons.

HI 181:     History of the Second World War

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
The course will examine the Second World War from a global perspective and include land, sea, and aerial operations. It will examine the battles and campaigns of the war, as well as the experiences of civilians behind the lines. It will encompass the war’s cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, social, and technological dimensions, as well as postwar issues.

HI 191:     History of Genocide in the Twentieth Century

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Major political, economic, intellectual, social, and scientific factors are considered in order to understand the cause and nature of genocides in a global setting. The course traces the development of the concept of ‘Race’ and the ideas and practices of annihilation and extermination in the twentieth century. Case-studies of, and comparisons amongst genocides from 1890 to the present construct a global history of the twentieth century in the context of genocide. Readings will be drawn from primary and secondary source material.

HI 195:     Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

3 class hours 3 credits Offered in Fall
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
The historical development of the three major Western religions. Among the topics to be discussed are: the relationships of the religions to the civilizations that encompassed them, major institutional developments, and the impact of modernity on their beliefs and practices.

LC 213:     Intermediate Chinese I

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: LC-112 or the equivalent, with a grade of C or better or permission of the Department
This course will continue to develop students’ communicative competence through the study of grammar, acquisition of new vocabulary, and practice of the four language skills— listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Content-appropriate cultural information will be presented to promote the students’ understanding of the Chinese-speaking world. This is the first semester of a two-semester course of intermediate Chinese.

LC 214:     Intermediate Chinese II

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisites: LC-213 or the equivalent with a grade of C or better or permission of the Department
The focus of this course is to continue the improvement of oral communication skills, along with reading, writing, and grammar. It is designed to help students expand their vocabulary, and to study more complex grammatical structures. Components of Chinese culture will be integrated through readings, discussions and realia.

LC 311:     Readings in Contemporary Chinese Literature I

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: LC-214 and/or permission of the Department
This course aims to enhance students’ understanding of Chinese society and modern Chinese literature through reading a variety of modern Chinese literary genres including essays, short stories, and a short play. The emphasis is on reading comprehension and expansion of vocabulary. Class discussions are on issues related to the readings.

LC 312:     Readings in Contemporary Chinese Literature II

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: LC-311 and/or permission of the Department
Study and analysis of selected literary works from contemporary Chinese authors. Each reading selection will reflect a different side of Chinese society. Course instruction and assessment will include lectures, class discussions and written reports.

LC 321:     Business Chinese I

3 hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: Foreign Language Placement
This course is designed for advanced speakers of Chinese. The curriculum provides advanced training in Chinese speaking, reading and writing skills using original business related materials. The emphasis of the course is on the mastery of general vocabulary and language structures used in the area of business. Social and behavioral cultural codes are also covered.

LF 213:     Intermediate French I

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: LF-112 or the equivalent, with a grade of C or better or permission of the Department
Review of French grammar; selected readings in French literature studied and analyzed.

LF 214:     Intermediate French II

3 class hours 3 credits Offered in Spring
Prerequisite: LF-213 or the equivalent, with a grade of C or better or permission of the Department
Intensive training in literary analysis through study of French works. Emphasis on French composition and conversation.

LF 401:     French and Francophone Cultures Today

3 hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Not credited toward the language requirement. Elective credit only.
Prerequisite: BE- 122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.
A civilization course featuring contemporary France and selected French-speaking countries or regions of Africa, North America, the Caribbean and the Far East with emphasis on the diversity of cultures within the French-speaking world. This course is taught in English.

LG 213:     Intermediate German I

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: LG-112 or the equivalent, with a grade of C or better or permission of the Department
Intensive review of German grammar through practice of the phonological and grammatical structure of German orally and in writing. Selected readings in contemporary German prose.

LG 401:     The Culture of German-Speaking Countries Today

3 hours 3 credits Offered as needed.
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
Students will be exposed to and discuss cultural developments in German-speaking countries including their role the European Union. They will read English translations of contemporary writings and apply an interdisciplinary approach to texts, films, and music, focusing on various facets of life and culture. Students will also attend cultural events in New York City. The course will be taught in English as WI.

LH 213:     Intermediate Hebrew I

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: LH-112 or the equivalent, with a grade of C or better or permission of the Department
General review of grammar covered in Hebrew I (LH-111) and Hebrew II (LH-112); readings, short stories, reports, and discussions in the language.

LI 213:     Intermediate Italian I

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: LI-112 or the equivalent, with a grade of C or better or permission of the Department
General review of grammar; readings and discussion in Italian.

LS 213:     Intermediate Spanish I

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: LS-112 or the equivalent, with a grade of C or better or permission of the Department
Review of Spanish grammar with intensive aural-oral practice, through the use of videotapes and selected readings.

LS 214:     Intermediate Spanish II

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: LS-213 or the equivalent, with a grade of C or better or permission of the Department
Emphasis on written composition. Selections from Spanish and Spanish-American literature read and analyzed.

LS 221:     Workshop in Reading and Writing for Spanish Herita

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: LS-214 with a grade of C or better or placement through Native/Heritage Speakers Placement Test
This class is designed for students whose greatest exposure to Spanish has been in the home and the community rather than in the classroom. The program builds on the linguistic knowledge that students already bring to the classroom and develops their oral and written language skills through the analysis, comparison and evaluation of current social issues in Spain and Latin America.

LS 222:     Workshop in Reading and Writing for Spanish Herita

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: LS 221 with a grade of C or better or placement through Native/Heritage Speakers Placement Test
Moving beyond the mechanics of composition in Spanish, this course emphasizes different genres of writing in the heritage language such as description, report and narration. Readings and class discussions focus on contemporary Spanish and Latin American cultures, politics and art.

LS 223:     Workshop in Reading and Writing for Spanish Herita

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: LS 222 with a grade of C or better or placement through Native/Heritage Speakers Placement Test
This course emphasizes different genres of writing in the heritage language, focusing on strategies used in expository, persuasive and argumentative writing. Readings and class discussions focus on contemporary Spanish and Latin American cultures, politics and art.

LS 311:     Spanish Literature of the Nineteenth Century

3 class hours 3 credits Offered every other semester
Prerequisite: LS-214 and/or LS-223 with a grade of C or better, or placement through Native/Heritage Speakers Placement Test
Study of major literary movements in Spain during the nineteenth century: Romanticism, Regionalism, Realism, and Naturalism. Analysis of the major poets, playwrights, and novelists of the period. Readings and discussions in Spanish.

LS 312:     Spanish Literature of the Twentieth Century

3 class hours 3 credits Offered every other semester
Prerequisite: LS-214 and/or LS-223, or permission of the Department
Study of major literary movements and authors in Spain from the Generation of 1898 to the present. Analysis of the works and philosophical thought of Unamuno, Ortega y Gasset, Benavente, Garcia Lorca, and the writers of the post-Civil War period, such as Cela and Delibes. Readings and discussion in Spanish.

LS 315:     Reading in Contemporary Spanish-American Literatur

3 class hours 3 credits Offered every other semester
Prerequisite: LS-214 and/or LS-223 with a grade of C or better or placement through Native/Heritage Speakers Placement Test
Analysis and discussion of representative works of contemporary Spanish-American authors. Readings and discussion in Spanish.

LS 402:     Latin American and Caribbean Cultures Today

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisites: BE-122 (or BE-226) and BE-112 (or BE-205), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
A journey into contemporary Latin American and Caribbean cultures through the reading and discussion of politics, customs, art, music and cinema.This course will be taught in English.

PLSC 140:     Comparative Political Systems

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or BE-226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test.
Analysis of the political systems of the major powers in Europe. Topics include: nationalism, liberalism, democracy, Marxism, and fascism; a brief political background; an analysis of the role of political parties and pressure groups, and executive-legislative relations; factors behind the demise of the Soviet Union and the politics of European integration.

PLSC 170:     War, Revolution, and Terrorism

3 class hours 3 credits Offered as needed
Prerequisite: BE-122 (or 226), or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment Test
An interdisciplinary survey of why and how nations, organizations, and individuals use violence to achieve political ends. Investigation of economic, social, and political conditions that stimulate violence in contemporary society — such as international, civil, and guerrilla war; revolution; terrorism; revolt, or threat. The ideological and legal aspects of violence also examined.

 

Go back | Pathways Home

For Students:

For Faculty: