(I.C)   Life and Physical Sciences (3 credits)

Please Note: BI-140, 201, 301, and certain advanced courses in Biology require laboratory dissections of selected animals. In those courses in which a kit is loaned to the student, the course work will not be considered complete until the materials have been returned.

BI 131:     Foundations of Biology

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) & BE-122 (or BE-226) or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT assessment test
An introductory course that provides an understanding of the natural world and how this knowledge can be applied to everyday life. Basic concepts in biology are explained with emphasis on cellular basis of life, genetics, reproduction, evolution, and ecology. Hands-on laboratory experience reinforces concepts learned in lecture and also includes dissection of selected vertebrates.

BI 140:     Principles of Biology

3 class hours 3 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-126) or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment test. Credit will not be given to students who have successfully completed BI-201.
A comprehensive approach to the interaction of living things in the biological world. Topics include the cellular basis of life, genetics, reproduction, evolution, and ecology. The laboratory experience includes dissection of selected vertebrates.

BI 170:     Plants and People

3 class hours 3 credits
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-126) or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment test
Plant forms and functions including plant evolution, ecology, heredity and diseases; plants in history, folklore, agriculture, horticulture, and industry, plant drugs and poison.

BI 201:     General Biology I

3 class hours 3 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-126) or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment test
Structure of the cell and molecular basis of life. Classical and modern genetics and “molecular biology.” Homeostasis-control mechanisms, both intracellular and intercellular. A comparative study of organ systems with emphasis on the vertebrate, using laboratory dissection of selected animals.

BI 301:     Anatomy and Physiology I

3 class hours 3 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-126) or satisfactory score on the CUNY/ACT Assessment test. Students may not receive credit for BI-301 without BI-302.
First semester of a one year integrated lecture and laboratory course for the study of the structure and function of the human organism. Topics include: biological chemistry, cellular ultrastructure and metabolism, tissues and organs, and a systematic study of both the anatomy and physiology of all of the organ systems of the body. Laboratory work includes mammalian dissection and physiological experiments

BI 520:     Public Health Science

3 class hours 3 laboratory hours (including field observations)
4 credits Prerequisites: BE-112 (or BE-205) and BE-122 (or BE-226) or satisfactory scores on the CUNY ACT Assessment test
A study of how society deals with health and disease; topics include major determinants of health and disease, community health, health care delivery systems and manpower. Selected exercises in physiology and anatomy provide background needed to understand major problems in environmental health and public health. Field observations at nearby community health, environmental, and industrial facilities reinforce these concepts.

CH 101:     Living in a Chemical World

3 class hours 3 credits
This is a lecture course with hands-on laboratory experiments where the role of chemistry in everyday processes is highlighted and discussed. Topics covered include: The chemistry of food and medicines, vitamins and minerals, water and air, household products and fuels. The approach is non-mathematical and strives towards making chemistry stimulating and relevant to daily life. The goal is to introduce the applied aspects of chemistry to non-science majors, explain the world we live in, and to aid students to become more educated consumers and citizens. The Writing Intensive section includes writing assignments centered around these topics.
Successful completion of CH-101 satisfies the Life and Physical Sciences General Educations Core Requirement. To satisfy the laboratory science requirement for the A.A. degree, students are required to take the associated laboratory class CH-102. May not be used as part of the Mathematics or Science Concentration required in the A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum.

CH 106:     Chemistry and the Arts (Combined Lecture and Lab)

4 credits, 3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
This course offers a general background in the connections between chemistry and the arts. Topics include light absorption and reflection; the nature of color; additive and subtractive color mixing; separation of mixtures; properties of paints and pigments; preservation and authentication of art objects; common chemical hazards; and the principles of photography. The laboratory component applies chemical theory and techniques to practices involved in creating works of art. Students use modern laboratory instrumentation and methods such as chromatography to make and examine materials used in art.
This course is required for the A.A.S. degree in Digital Art and Design and is recommended for students in programs offered by the Art and Photography Department. This course satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the A. A. degree. Completing CH-106 is equivalent to completing CH-103 and CH-104. This course may not be used as part of the Mathematics or Science concentration in A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum and is not open to students who have completed CH-151, CH-152, CH-251 or CH-252.

CH 110:     Chemistry and the Environment

3 class hours 3 credits
This is a lecture course with hands-on laboratory experiments where the role of chemistry in current environmental topics of interest to all citizens is examined. Topics covered include: Green Chemistry, Acid Rain, Destruction of Ozone layer, Greenhouse effect and Global Warming, Traditional and Alternative Energy sources, Air, Water and Land Pollution - sources, effects, detection and control / prevention. An emphasis is placed on the importance of practicing green chemistry in order to achieve a sustainable civilization. The Writing Intensive section includes writing assignments centered around these topics.
Successful completion of CH-110 satisfies the Life and Physical Sciences General Educations Core Requirement. To satisfy the laboratory science requirement for the A.A. degree, students are required to take the associated laboratory class CH-111. May not be used as part of the Mathematics or Science Concentration required in the A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum.

CH 116:     Introduction to Nanoscience

3 credits, 3 class hours
Pre-requisites: none
This hybrid lecture and laboratory course will give students an introduction to nanoscience chemistry and its technological applications in our society. The synthesis of nanomaterials, the tools used to characterize these materials and societal impacts of nanomaterials and nanotechnology (such as ethical, legal and environmental implications) will be covered. Successful completion of CH-116 satisfies the Life and Physical Sciences General Education Core Requirement. Students are strongly encouraged to take CH-117 lab while taking CH-116 lecture to satisfy the laboratory science requirement for graduation and improve the chances of transfer to other colleges. This course may not be used as part of the Science or Mathematics Concentration required for the A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum.

CH 120:     Fundamentals of Chemistry

3 class hours 3 credits
This hybrid lecture and laboratory course covers the most fundamental laws, theories, and principles of general chemistry, including classification and properties of matter; measurements; elements and compounds; atomic theory and structure; the periodic table; chemical equations; the mole concept and stoichiometry; chemical bonding; and acids and bases. This course includes five experiments to give students hands-on experience with basic laboratory methods and application of theory. Knowledge of basic mathematics is assumed. Students are strongly encouraged to also take CH-121 (Fundamentals of Chemistry Laboratory).
Successful completion of CH-120 and CH-121 satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the A.A. degree. This course is not open to students who have completed CH-127, 128, 151, 152, 251, or 252.

CH 127:     Introductory College Chemistry

3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours, 4.5 credits
This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence intended to provide students with basic knowledge of general chemistry. The second semester introduces organic chemistry (CH-128). Topics include units of measurement and dimensional analysis, elements and compounds, atomic structure, chemical bonding and chemical reactions, properties of solutions and chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, physical states and gas laws, intra- and intermolecular forces, and nuclear chemistry. In the laboratory component, students apply the scientific method to explore natural phenomena using basic experimental techniques.
The course is a requirement for the B.S. or B.A. in Nursing, Nutrition, and other Allied Health Professions. It also satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the A.S. in Health Sciences, A.A. in Liberal Arts and Sciences (non-science concentration) and other non-science majors. This course is not open to students who have completed CH-151, CH-152, CH-251, and CH-252.

CH 128:     Introductory Organic Chemistry

Prerequisites: CH-120, CH-127 or CH-151
3 lecture hours, 4 laboratory hours, 4.5 credits
 This course is the second of a two-semester sequence and is intended to provide a brief, but thorough introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. The major functional groups such as hydrocarbons, alcohols, amines and carbonyl compounds are studied with some emphasis on nomenclature, reactions, and stereochemistry. Several aspects of organic chemistry related to biochemistry are also stressed including units on amino acids, enzymes, carbohydrates and lipids. The laboratory introduces students to the various synthetic methods for making organic compounds, as well as to purification techniques like distillation, recrystallization and extraction.
This course is recommended for students in Nursing and others planning to pursue careers in the Allied Health fields. It may be used as a preparation for CH-251, but may not be substituted for CH-251 and is not open to students who have already completed CH-251 or CH-252.

CH 151:     General Chemistry I

Prerequisite: MA-119 and MA-121 or satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Test. Students who have not had high school chemistry are strongly advised to take CH-127 prior to CH-151.
3 class hours, 1 recitation hour, 3 laboratory hours, 4.5 credits
This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence that provides students with a fundamental knowledge of the modern theory in general and inorganic chemistry. It covers topics that are essential to many disciplines in science and technology, and the health professions, with an emphasis on developing problem-solving skills. Topics include matter and energy; chemical nomenclature; mass relationships and stoichiometry; reactions in aqueous solutions; gas laws and kinetic molecular theory; atomic structure and quantum theory; periodicity of elements; chemical bonding and molecular structure; states of matter and intermolecular forces; properties of solutions; and colligative properties. Laboratory work provides training in common experimental methods and hands-on application of theory. The students in Honors classes will attend scientific seminars and write a short paper.

CH 152:     General Chemistry II

Prerequisite: CH-151
3 class hours, 1 recitation hour, 3 laboratory hours, 4.5 credits
This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence that provides students with a fundamental knowledge of the modern theory in general and inorganic chemistry. It covers topics that are essential to many disciplines in science and technology, and the health professions, with an emphasis on developing problem-solving skills. Topics include enthalpy, entropy, and free energy; chemical kinetics; chemical equilibrium in gaseous and aqueous systems; properties and equilibria of acids and bases; buffers and acid-base titrations; solubility and complex ion equilibria; qualitative analysis; electrochemistry and redox reactions; and an introduction to nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work provides training in common experimental methods and hands-on application of theory. The students in Honors classes will give 10-15 minute oral presentations on topics and concepts chosen from the course material. This course makes extensive use of computers and requires the development of scientific communication skills.

CH 251:     Organic Chemistry I

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 4 laboratory hours
5 credits
Corequisite: CH-152, by permission of the Department
The relationship between structure and properties of organic compounds is discussed, with emphasis on reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and synthesis. Laboratory work involves preparation, isolation, and identification of organic compounds.

CH 252:     Organic Chemistry II

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 4 laboratory hours
5 credits Prerequisite: CH-251.
A sequel to CH-251; this course develops the relationship between properties and structure of organic compounds in greater detail. In addition, current syntheses, modern mechanisms of organic reactions, and spectroscopic identification of compounds are discussed. The main families of organic compounds of biochemical interest and their typical reactions are studied. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, purification, and identification of organic compounds, as well as organic qualitative analysis including IR spectroscopy.

ET 841:     The Science of Energy and Power in the Modern Worl

3 Class Hours 3 Credits
Prerequisites (and/or) co-requisites: none
This course examines the science and technology of energy and how humans use it on a daily basis. Topics include: importance of energy in modern society; how energy is used in food production, materials, manufacturing, transportation, communications, lighting, heating and cooling ; the relationship between various forms of energy and greenhouse gases; individual and societal conservation methods and their economical and environmental impact; the laws of thermodynamics and equations relating energy, work and power; the electrical grid and elementary home and auto wiring; the pn junction and active and passive solar technology; wind, hydro, wave, geo and ocean thermal renewable energy schemes; the fuel cell and the new generation of electromechanical propulsion; Law of Conservation of Energy.

GE 101:     Physical Geology

3 class hours 3 laboratory hours 4 credits
Earth materials and landscapes are studied to formulate the principles of geology. Laboratory studies include minerals, rocks, soils, and topographic maps. A field trip to the American Museum of Natural History is a course requirement.

PH 101:     Principles of Physics

3 class hours 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Presents a modern overview of the world around us, from the sub-miniature world inside an atomic nucleus to the vastness of outer space. Investigates selected subjects of interest to modern man in depth and detail. An understanding of physical principles is the major goal. Minimal use of mathematics. This course, or its equivalent, is required for elementary education majors at The City College.

PH 111:     Space, Astronomy and Our Universe

2.25 class hours .075 laboratory hours 3 credits
“Space, Astronomy, and our Universe” discusses topics related to space and astronomy, beginning with our planet and our Moon, and extending to stars, galaxies, and the Universe as a whole. This course will explore physical processes and laws that govern the motion and evolution of all objects in the Universe, including planets, stars and galaxies.

PH 140:     Acoustics: The Physics of Sound

3 lecture hours 1 recitation hour 2 lab hours 4 credits
Corequisite: MA-321 or MA-119 and MA-121 or MA-114 or the equivalent
Traveling waves and standing waves, energy, sound intensity, interaction of sound and materials, methods of sounds production by musical instruments, room acoustics, interference, human ear response to sound, magnetism and induction as they relate to audio equipment, microphones, speakers, pick-ups. This course is intended to satisfy the physics requirement for the Music Production Degree but is open to all majors.

PH 201:     General Physics I

3 class hours 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisite: MA-114 or MA-119 and MA-121 or the equivalent, or satisfactory score on the Mathematics Placement Test, Level II.
A beginning course for technology students. Topics include units, vectors, equilibrium, linear motion, Newton’s laws, circular motion, angular motion, momentum, and fluid motion. Emphasis is on applications. A working knowledge of simple algebra is assumed.

PH 202:     General Physics II

3 class hours 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisite: PH-201 (with a grade of C or better)
Second semester of PH-201, 202 sequence. Topics include vibration and wave motion, electrostatics, electric and magnetic fields, electromagnetic waves, optics and topics in modern physics.

PH 301:     College Physics I

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisite: MA-119 and MA-121 or MA-114 or equivalent or permission of the department
PH-301 and 302 are designed for students who need or want two semesters of noncalculus physics, such as those planning careers in optometry, dentistry, and other medically-related fields. Topics include conservation laws, vectors, laws of motion, linear and angular momentum, energy, gravitation, and thermodynamics.

PH 302:     College Physics II

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 2 laboratory hours 4 credits
Prerequisite: PH-301 (with a grade of C or better)
Second-semester course following PH-301. Topics include electro-magnetism, vibrations wave phenomena and radiation, and modern physics.

PH 411:     Calculus Physics I

2 class hours 2 recitation hours 2 laboratory hours
3.5 credits Prerequisite: MA-440, or the equivalent Corequisite: MA-441
Fundamental principles of mechanics; includes kinematics, classical laws of motion, statics, conservation laws, work, mechanical energy, and simple harmonic motion.

PH 412:     Calculus Physics II

2 class hours 2 recitation hours 2 laboratory hours 3 credits
Prerequisite: PH-411 (with a grade of C or better)
Corequisite: MA-442
Fundamentals of heat, waves, and optics; includes heat transfer, first and second laws of thermodynamics, kinetic theory of gases; nature of light, geometrical and physical optics; optical instruments; sound.

PH 311:     College Physics A

3 class hours 1 recitation hour 2 laboratory hours
4 credits Prerequisite: MA-441 or equivalent or permission of Department
First part of a two-semester introduction to physics with applications to biology, primarily for students majoring in biology or planning careers in optometry, dentistry, and other medically related fields. Topics include conservation laws, vectors, laws of motion, linear and angular momentum, energy, gravitation, fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. Strong algebra skills and knowledge of the ideas of calculus are required.

 

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