QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
What are the Freshman Academies?
What are the Areas of Study under each of the six academies?
What makes the Freshman Academies at Queensborough unique?
What are the responsibilities of the Faculty Coordinators?
Who are the Faculty Coordinators? 
What are the High Impact Learning Experiences?
What are Cornerstone Courses?
What is an e-Portfolio?
What is a Learning Community?
What is Service Learning?
What is a Writing Intensive Course?
What are the responsibilities of the Freshman Coordinators?
How can the Freshman Coordinators assist Faculty?
Who participates in a Freshman Academy?
Are part-time students placed in academies?
How many students are assigned to each Freshman Coordinator?
Can transfer students be placed in the academies?
How are students targeted for academy enrollment?
If students change their program of study, can they change academies?
How long is a student's stay in an academy?
If a student “stops-out,” can they later be re-admitted to an academy?
What happens to a student on academic probation or one who is academically dismissed?
What kinds of student activities will be merged into each academy?
Will Academy activities be open to other students?
What are some of the specific responsibilities of the Freshman Coordinators?
What are the locations of the designated areas for each of the six academies?
What will be housed in the Freshman Academy locations?
What is the role of academic support services/tutoring in the academies, and what are the mechanics for how Faculty Coordinators and Freshman Coordinators will interact with tutoring centers/academic support programs?
Why should/could academic support/tutoring be considered one of the academies' "high impact activities"? 
What are the Freshman Academies?
The Freshman Academies will bring incoming full-time freshmen together by related program(s) of study with faculty and student affairs support staff, thereby creating smaller a more personalized learning experience. Their design represents a strengthening of the College's commitment to student success with a three-fold focus to:
  • Provide a more coordinated student services and academic undergraduate experience
  • Improve retention and graduation rates
  • Build students' commitment to their future education and lifelong careers.

Six Freshman Academies will be fully in effect for the Fall 2009 semester:

  • Business
  • Education
  • Health Related Sciences
  • Liberal Arts
  • Science Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
  • Visual and Performing Arts (launched in Fall 2008)
What are the areas of study under each of the six academies?
Freshman Academy for Business
___ Accounting
___ Business Administration
___ Computer Information Systems
___ Health Care Office Administration
___ Management
___ Microsoft Office Applications Proficiency Preparation
___ Office Administration and Technology
___ School Secretary

Freshman Academy for Education
___ Childhood Education
___ Day Care Assistant

Freshman Academy for STEM  (Science, Technologies, Engineering & Mathematics)

Science & Mathematics:
___ Liberal Arts and Sciences (Mathematics & Science)
___ Science for Forensics

Engineering & Technology:
___ Engineering Science
___ Engineering Technology:
       •  Computer, Electronic, Laser & Fiber Optics, Mechanical
___ Technology:
       •  Computerized Architectural & Industrial Design, Computerized Manufacturing, New Media, Telecommunications

Freshman Academy for Liberal Arts
___   Criminal Justice
___   Liberal Arts and Sciences:
       •  English, Foreign Languages, History, Social Sciences

Freshman Academy for Visual and Performing Arts
____   Digital Art & Design
____   Gallery and Museum Studies 
____   Music Electronic Technology
____ Visual and Performing Arts:
       •  Art, Photography, Dance, Music, Theatre Arts

Freshman Academy for Health Related Sciences
____ Environmental Health
____ Health Sciences
____ Massage Therapy
____ Medical Office Assistant
____ Nursing
What makes the Freshman Academies at Queensborough unique?
While many colleges, including Queensborough, are engaged in similar programs, what has been accomplished to date has been targeted to a limited number of students. What is new about Queensborough's Freshman Academies is that we are scaling it up so as to institutionalize the effort and concentrate all services into six academies for every first-time, full-time freshman.

This is accomplished through a high degree of collaboration and coordination between the College's academic departments and student services. Specific coursework  and high impact learning experiences are planned for each academy. These academic components are developed and coordinated by a Faculty Coordinator for each academy in consultation with department chairs, and are complemented by a streamlining of student support services provided by a Freshmen Coordinator. 
What are the responsibilities of the Faculty Coordinators?
Faculty Coordinators, designated by and reporting to Dean Michele Cuomo in the Office of Academic Affairs, are responsible for the delivery of key coursework and high impact learning activities that reflect the goals and intended outcomes of each academy as well as those defined in the College's general educational goals and objectives. 

They will:
  • work with department chairs to identify and schedule high impact learning experiences and dedicated academy course sections;
  • work with the College's Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) to iesure that faculty development needs related to academy-based teaching/learning initiatives are met;
  • maintain ongoing communication among faculty and the Office of Academic Affairs on the assessment of intended Academy outcomes;
  • serve as a communicative bridge between the faculty and student support services through the Freshman Coordinator;
  • coordinate assessment of curricular activities associated with the academies;
  • direct projects which receive grant funds through the academies; and
  • work closely with the Freshmen Coordinators and other Student Affairs personnel on the promotion of the Academies to incoming students via new student events (including the “FRESHMEN FIRST” new student orientation program) and will assist in the design of appropriate academic advisement and course registration for incoming freshmen.

Each Faculty Coordinator will receive release time for their service.

Who are the Faculty Coordinators? 
Freshman Academy Faculty Coordinators 2009-2010
 
Freshman Academy for Business
  Office Location* Extension

Dr. Jonas Falik, Professor and Chair, Business 
A 405 6245
Ms. Christine Mooney, Assistant Professor, Business A 405 5404
Freshman Academy for Education
Ms. Renee Rhodd, Articulation Coordinator of Education with Queens College  M 125  6027
Freshman Academy for Health Related Sciences

Ms. Alexandra Tarasko, Professor, Nursing
M 322 6085
Freshman Academy for Liberal Arts

Dr. Peter Bales, Associate Professor, Social Sciences and History
M 404 5031

Dr. Anne Marie-Bourbon, Professor,
Foreign Languages and Literatures
H 220 5373

Dr. Megan Elias, Assistant Professor, History 
M 409  5052

Mr. David Rothman, Instructor,
Basic Educational Skills 
H 324  5216

Dr. Linda Stanley, Professor, English   
H 416 5475
Freshman Academy for STEM (Science, Technologies, Engineering & Mathematics)

Dr. Moni Chauhan, Associate Professor, Chemistry 
S 443 5573
Mr. Robert Kueper, Associate Professor, Electrical
and Computer Engineering Technology
T8 5246
Freshman Academy for Visual and Performing Arts
Ms. Georgia McGill, Associate Professor, Speech Communications and Theatre Arts H 125 5370

*The Faculty Coordinators will continue to be housed in their Academic Offices; they will not reside in the Freshman Academy designated locations.
What are the High Impact Learning Experiences?
The Faculty Coordinator(s) of each Freshmen Academy will identify two high learning experiences to be incorporated into the academic structure of the specific academy. Ideally, incoming freshmen will participate in one of these activities within their first or second semester, with the expectation that both educational activities will be completed within the first 30 credits. 

Examples:

Cornerstone courses, e-Portfolio, Service Learning, Learning Communities, Writing Intensive courses. (For definitions, see below)
What are Cornerstone Courses?
These introductory-level subject-based courses will introduce freshmen to the College's general education outcomes of communication (reading, writing, speaking), critical thinking, information management and the development of values needed for success in today's diverse society. Specific to each academy, these cornerstone courses will be provide a rigorous academic experience that encourages positive student-faculty relationships with significant interaction outside of the classroom. Student-produced artifacts will be incorporated into the assessment of these capstone courses.

Example:

English 101 is the first credit-bearing composition course and serves as a cornerstone in the Liberal Arts Academy. 
What is an e-Portfolio?
An electronic archiving system that, integrated into one or more specific courses, provides a personal platform for student achievement of stated academic competencies and additionally allows for individual student reflection and growth.

Example: 

Faculty from EN 103 New Media Writing, ED 110 Contemporary Education, Principles and Practices, and BE 122 College Reading and Study Skills Improvement worked together on an e-portfolio project in a virtual learning community of students. 
What is a Learning Community?
By bringing two or more courses together, students and faculty gain the opportunity to more thoroughly investigate common themes with shared outcomes for learning and assessment. 

Example: 

“Language, Culture and Community” - English Composition I EN 101 and Introduction to Psychology SS 510. This learning community examines how the individual grows and develops through assigned readings and learning activities in both English and Psychology classes. Students look at human behavior with a special focus on hidden messages and meanings in language, social interaction and cultural values.
What is Service Learning?
Specifically planned extracurricular activities of a socially beneficial nature, identified as part of a course's requirements, which complement the intended outcomes of the course.

Example:
To date, over 500 Queensborough students have participated in service learning activities that have provided service to the Queens Literacy Program, the CUNY Language Immersion Program, Alley Pond Environmental Center, Plazas Communitarias, Saratoga Family Inn (Homes for the Homeless), and the Center for Immigrant Health.

What is a Writing Intensive Course?
Courses identified in each curricular area that incorporate specific strategies and assignments designed to strengthen the writing abilities of freshmen.  Two writing intensive courses are required for all students as part of the College's graduation requirements.

Example:  
In TH 221, Acting 2, students write in journals about their classroom experiences for ungraded “low-stakes” writing.  They also submit two reviews of theatrical productions they have viewed, and write character biographies for the roles they perform in class, for a total of ten pages of writing which is revised throughout the semester.

What are the responsibilities of the Freshman Coordinators?
The Freshman Coordinators are entry-level (Assistant to HEO) student personnel professionals who will actively guide freshmen from the point of admission through the first two semesters of the college experience.  Working collaboratively with Susan Curtis, the Director of New Student Enrollment Services and the Faculty Coordinator for their academy, they will participate in the advisement, registration, and orientation activities and will act as a bridge for academy freshmen with support services including tutoring, financial aid, counseling, and career services.
How can the Freshman Coordinators assist Faculty?
The Freshman Coordinator can be a valuable resource for the Faculty Coordinators and for all faculty.  Faculty in the classroom are often the “front line” for student questions and concerns.  While many questions may be addressed by faculty, with a referral to an appropriate office, other issues may require more attention.  Faculty may refer new Freshmen to an academy-specific Freshman Coordinator for a more in-depth action. It is the responsibility of the Freshman Coordinator to research the concern, contact the student and recommend appropriate follow-up, whether that be tutoring, counseling or other issues that can be assisted through the College's support services and staff.
Who participates in a Freshman Academy?
All first-time, full-time students will be registered into one of the six academies based upon their stated program of study. Students whose interests change may move to a different academy within their first year.
Are part-time students placed in academies?
The majority of incoming freshmen do register as full-time students.  However, those incoming freshmen who are registered as part-time students will be invited to participate in academy-sponsored special events and other activities.  Freshmen Coordinators, working with other areas of Student Affairs, will make sure that these students are given the appropriate assistance and service.
How many students are assigned to each Freshman Coordinator?
The average “case load” per Freshman Coordinator is expected to be 200 to 250 freshmen in the fall, with additional freshmen allocated for the spring semester.  Therefore, the interaction among the Freshman Coordinator, the Faculty Coordinator and the offices of Student Affairs is critical to the delivery of services to all freshmen.
Can transfer students be placed in the academies?
The academies have been designed specifically for incoming first year college freshmen. However, those transfer students accepted and registered who have no academic credits (non-accredited college attendance, for example) can be included in academy-specific activities.
How are students targeted for academy enrollment?
New freshmen inform us at several points through the enrollment process of their intended program of study, specifically at the time of admissions and later at the advisement and registration. To foster the success of the academies and its benefits to students, the Freshmen Coordinators will work closely with the areas of New Student Enrollment Services to more comprehensively assist new freshmen in selecting the program of study most appropriate to them. 

Plans are underway for academy-based New Student Welcomes (freshman orientations) which will address student interests and goals prior to the advisement/registration process. 
If students change their program of study, can they change academies?
The faculty of the ST-100 and 101 classes are responsible for the advisement and registration process of first semester students for the following semester. It is during this semester that many students do change their intended program.  Freshmen Coordinators will work closely with the ST-100 faculty as well as members of the Academic Advisement Center to oversee freshmen “transfer” from one academy to another. They will follow up with the coordinators of other academies to ensure this transfer occurs.
How long is a student's stay in an academy?
Through the design of the cornerstone and high impact learning opportunities, full-time students taking 15 credits per semester will participate in an academy through the completion of their first 30 credits, or one year.

The Freshmen Coordinator will actively oversee student progress through the first two semesters – a period of greatest vulnerability for new students. Working with the Faculty Coordinator and the offices within Student Affairs, transition plans for academy students to the Academic Advisement Center *, to faculty advisement * and other support services will be defined for the third semester and beyond.

* Advisement will continue to follow the College's existing advisement policy.
If a student “stops-out,” can they later be re-admitted to an academy?
Yes.  As soon as they are accepted for re-admission, they will be contacted by the appropriate Freshmen Coordinator. (Note: Those re-admitted with more than 30 credits would not return to the Freshman Academy.)
What happens to a student on academic probation or one who is academically dismissed?
Students on academic probation are subjected to the rules of the College that apply to all students. If they are dismissed with less than 30 credits, and later accepted for re-admission (decisions made by the Admissions Committee), they can return to their academy. They must, as with any dismissed student, meet certain academic requirements to remain in attendance.
What kinds of student activities will be merged into each academy?
The Faculty Coordinator, in tandem with Student Affairs and department chairs, will develop programming (field trips, workshops, guest speakers, special events). Some already existing activities might be re-shaped to provide an academy-specific focus.  For example, a “fair” featuring careers and transfer options for the Education Academy is being implemented. The Freshmen Coordinator will assist in the promotion of these events to the students as well as in the implementation.
Will Academy activities be open to other students?
Yes. For example, performances will be open to all students.  
What are some of the specific responsibilities of the Freshman Coordinators?
The Freshmen Coordinators are responsible for facilitating and overseeing student progress from the point of admission through the first two semesters. As such, they will work with New Student Enrollment Services, Advisement, Financial Aid, Testing, Counseling and other offices to ensure successful and timely registration, clarification of intended program of study (and assignment to the right academy), personalization of the College's Early Alert process and, working with the Faculty Coordinator and other areas of Student Affairs, design and implement appropriate extracurricular programming.
What are the locations of the designated areas for each of the six academies?
  1. Visual and Performing Arts:  The current, temporary location is Administration-204. The permanent location will be Library Basement 23.

  2. Education:  Medical Arts 127

  3. Liberal Arts:  Humanities 350 and 351

  4. Business:  Administration 405Y

  5. Health Related Sciences:  Medical Arts 320

  6. STEM:  Science 332
What will be housed in the Freshman Academy locations?
The dedicated locations of the Freshman Academies is where the Freshman Coordinator will be housed. The academy students assigned to that Freshman Coordinator will meet with the Freshman Coordinator at these locations.
What is the role of academic support services/tutoring in the academies, and what are the mechanics for how Faculty Coordinators and Freshman Coordinators will interact with tutoring centers/academic support programs?
One of the most important objectives of the Freshman Academy initiative is to ensure that students become aware and take advantage of the instructional support services on campus which will help them succeed in their studies at the College. 

Individual Faculty members should continue to refer their students to appropriate Learning Centers, including the Campus Writing Center, The Campus Learning Center, The Basic Skills Learning center and the Math & Science Learning Center, as student need arises. If faculty members feel that more intervention is needed, they may ask the Freshman Coordinators to walk students over and introduce them to the staff and tutors at the center.

Additionally, Faculty Coordinators have been charged with raising awareness among faculty members in the disciplines of their academies about instructional support services.
The Freshman Coordinators will also be proactive in referring students to the Learning Centers, and follow up with tutoring center staff, when appropriate, on the progress of their students.
Why should/could academic support/tutoring be considered one of the academies' "high impact activities"? 
The High Impact Activities are all pedagogical experiences in a classroom. Tutoring continues to serve to enhance the identified High Impact activities. For example, the Campus Writing Center supports WI and Cornerstone (i.e. EN 101) experiences and e-portfolio tutoring supports e-portfolio experiences.