Lecture Series Archive

The Jews of Greece and the Holocaust. Their Untold Story

Lecturer: Marcia Haddad Ikonomopoulos

Sunday, October 14, 2012, at 1:00 PM

Were there Jews living in Greece?

This is the dominant response that comes forth in discussing the Holocaust that took place in Greece.

The purpose of this lecture is two-fold. First, it is to tell the story of the Holocaust in Greece and its almost total annihilation of the Jewish Community by the Nazi forces. Second, it is a story that has been little told and we must see to it that the story is not only told, but remembered.

When the story of the Holocaust in Germany, Poland, Lithuania, Hungary and Austria is told, we can speak with great familiarity of these events and the people who were its characters. Yet, when Greece is mentioned there is a puzzling silence.

The Jews of Greece have two distinctions: the longest continual Jewish presence in the European Diaspora, going back 2300 years, and the unfortunate distinction of having lost the largest percentage of Jews of any officially occupied country during World War II.

Why were so many Jews lost in Greece in an environment that was conducive for their salvation?

Why does their story remain untold?

Marcia Haddad Ikonomopoulos is the president of the Association of Friends of Greek Jewry and the Museum Director of Kehila Kedosha of Janina Synagogue and Museum. She has served as the Director of Special Projects for Sephardic House. As both an author and editor, Ms. Ikonomopoulos has created the text and visuals for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s website on the Holocaust in Greece. She is a member of the scholarly committee for review, translation and microfilming of the Salonika Archives at YIVO. She has presented a number of papers that include the history of Romaniote Jewry at the 2006 IAJGS Conference and on Romaniote Immigration at NYU’s conference for Modern Greek Studies Association in September 2011.

 

Two Generations Later, The Grandchildren Speak

Lecturer: Leora Klein

Sunday, September 9, 2012, at 1:00 PM

3G-NY/WEDU is not just another website. It is a dynamic group of more than 1500 plus members bound together by the fact that they are the grandchildren of Holocaust survivors and their desire to perpetuate the memory of the Holocaust. Leora Klein is the co-founder of 3GNY and the Director of WEDU, We Educate. Through Ms. Klein’s efforts the third generation in the New York Metropolitan area has undertaken a program of education, action and reflection, enabling them to honor its history and leverage personal connections to combat intolerance worldwide.

Ms. Klein teaches English Language and Literature at the Abraham Joshua Heschel School in Manhattan. She has earned a B.A. in English Literature and Theatre Arts from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.A. in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. Her essays and articles have appeared in numerous publications that include Yad Vashem’s Martyrdom and Resistance Magazine, The New York Sun, the New Jersey Jewish News and The Pennsylvania Gazette.

 

And Then There Were None: The Shoah after Survivors

Lecturer: David Widawsky

Sunday, September 9, 2012, at 1:00 PM

The Shoah ended 67 years ago and the youngest survivors are no longer young. Though many survivors have documented their stories in memoirs, audio and video recordings, nothing can substitute for their firsthand testimonies. Who will tell the stories and pass on the memories when they are no longer able to speak for themselves? Some of the responsibility will fall to museums and educators, but it is the children who grew up with the Shoah and lived with the stories that will serve as eyewitnesses for their parents and grandparents.

David Widawsky was born in Germany after WWII to parents who survived the Lodz Ghetto, Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen and Dachau. He is retired from a career as an urban planner and has begun a life dedicated to Holocaust Remembrance and Education. He is employed by March of the Living, serves on the Kupferberg Holocaust Center’s Advisory Board and heads the Center’s Second and Third Generation Group. He serves on the board of the Queens Jewish Community Council.

 

Unlocking Sarah's Key: A Collaboration with Evil

Lecturer: Lorraine Barbara Wind

Sunday, May 6, 2012 at 1:00 PM

Since France's Revolution of 1789, which took as its motto, "Liberté, Fraternité, Egalité," conservative elements of French society sought a return to its old regime. Although victorious against Germany in WWI, France found itself threatened by its former foe in 1940. Rather than fight, Marshall Henri Phillipe Pétain, a celebrated hero of that war, viewed this threat as an opportunity to create a new France, one that embraced the values of facism rather than democracy. Under his leadership, the Vichy Regime went beyond Nazi demands to ultimately leave an indelible stain on France's honor. This talk will examine the myths and paradoxes surrounding these shameful historical events that have recently received much attention through films such La Rafle and Sarah's Key.

Barbara Wind has served as the Director of the Holocaust Council of MetroWest for more than a decade. She earned a B.A. in English and an M.A. in Jewish-Christian Studies, served on the Executive Board of the New Jersey Council on the Humanities, the Sister Rose Thering Endowment, and is a Leadership NJ Fellow.

She is a poet, playwright, journalist, teacher and lecturer. Her poems have been published in numerous literary journals: The New Jersey State Commission on Holocaust Education Curriculum and also in JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association. She was a featured poet at the 2000 Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival.

 

History Is Mystery: What Is in the Suitcase?

Lecturer: Rita Scher Dytell

Sunday, June 3, 2012 at 1:00 PM

A couple trying to flee from what would be called the Holocaust arrives in New York in July, 1939. With them is the single suitcase that they were allowed to take.

What story does it tell? What is found within this suitcase and how do the many articles create a story? Who are these individuals? What is revealed of their education, backgrounds and interests? How do these articles serve to project the future of the newcomers in America?

Join with us as we examine the many articles within the suitcase as they each tell a story and develop a biographical and emotional picture of these escapees. Why do they act in a unique manner? What have they lost and what are they seeking?

Rita Scher Dytell earned her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the City University of New York. She is a Professor of Psychology at the College of Mount Saint Vincent and was Founder and Director of the Allied Health Studies graduate and undergraduate programs. Dr. Dytell participated in the 2006 New Perspectives on the Holocaust Summer Seminar sponsored by the Memorial Library. She has developed and teaches a senior level integrated course on Genocide 2007. She is currently developing and presenting her generic model of genocide.

 

My Race: A Jewish Girl Growing Up Under Apartheid in South Africa, From Shtetl to Apartheid to Freedom

Lecturer: Lorraine Lotzoff Abramson

Sunday, September 25, 2011 at 1:00 PM

At the 1973 Maccabi Games, Lorraine Lotzoff Abramson won a silver and a bronze medal as a runner with the United State's team. That was nowhere near her spectacular success the previous time she'd competed—in 1965—but the event carried a new pleasure: It was her first time representing her new country, a place with a relatively even playing field.

In 1965, she had been a member of the South African team. The wide-eyed 19 year old won gold medals in three racing events—100, 200, and 400 meters. But like so much in her life, the joy was tainted by her return to South Africa's tangled racial politics.

Ms. Abramson's story is a family story. Beginning in the shtetl of Ludza in Latvia, it expands to South Africa and then to the United States. In it she spells out the particular bind that faced Jews in South Africa. They came from the same countries as those in the United States and in the same waves of emigration, driven by pogroms and poverty. Like Americans in the South, they found themselves on the oppressors' side, safely sheltered from the exploitation and misery black people faced.

Some Jews reveled in it. Some were appalled and fought the system. A few went to jail or were deported for that opposition. But most complied with the law afraid of suffering or harming their families.

Her's is a powerful story of searching for one's destiny against a background of anti-Semitism, racism and the desire to excel in a free society.

 

2011, The New Anti-Semitism

Lecturer: Neal Scher, Former Director of
the Justice Department's Nazi Prosecution Office

Sunday, October 16, 2011 at 1:00 PM

More than ever before, those of us who deal within the area of Holocaust education have detected a growing confluence of factors illustrating a rise in anti-Semitism on campuses, directed against cultural organizations and incorporating an effort that does not deny the Holocaust but strives to delegitimize Israel and it's supporters.

As a long–time Director of the Justice Department's Nazi Prosecution Office (OSI), National Executive Director of AI-PAC, President of the American branch of the International Association of Jewish Lawyers and Jurists and an attorney in private practice in Washington, D.C. and New York for over three decades, Neal Sher has been at the forefront of activism on Jewish and Israeli causes.

Most recently, he has filed a federal civil rights case against the University of California at Berkeley on behalf of a Jewish student who was assaulted by a leader of a student Muslim organization, and a complaint with the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal alleging that York University in Toronto has legitimized an environment of anti-Semitism.

These cases and others like them are extremely important as the worldwide campaign to delegitimize and denigrate Israel has targeted campuses in North America as major battlegrounds.

 

"This I Saw and of This I Shall Tell"

Lecturer: Bernhard Storch, Soldier,
Liberator, Voice of Conscience

Sunday, December 11, 2011 at 1:00 PM

In 1940, as a teenager living in Poland, Bernhard Storch soon found himself torn from his family and sent to a Siberian labor camp by the invading Russian army. After two years, Storch enlisted in the First Infantry Division of the Polish Army and began a battle ordeal that would take him through the battlefields of Europe and into Berlin.

In his diary, he writes… "I helped to liberate the extermination camps in Poland of Sibibor and, Majdanek. I had no knowledge or warning of the unforgettable, shocking, devastating sights I would see. Thousands of victims were barely alive. After seeing what I had to at this point, my hope of seeing my family again had dwindled away."

Brernhard Storch saw what no human should have seen, the full brunt of the Holocaust. In his military service, he received seven major awards from the Polish army. He was discharged in 1945, married, left Poland in 1946 and arrived in New York City in 1947. Bernhard Storch vividly presents the soldier's view of the horrors committed against both Christians and Jews. He spoke before a special session of the United Nations on the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi death camps.

He has lectured to such unique groups as the United States Military Academy at West Point, the United States Coast Guard and to groups of Polish teachers in a program sponsored by the United States State Department.

 

SONG OF LIFE (To Tragoudi Tis Zios)
The Righteous Gentiles of the Holocaust in Greece– a film
Discussion with Joseph Varon
Sunday, March 13, 2011 at 1 PM

The presence of Jews in Greece traces their roots back to ancient times. These Greek Jews known as Romaniotes, spoke Greek (Judeo – Greek) and developed their own culture and customs within the confines of the Byzantine Empire. They lived and flourished on the main land of Greece as well as the islands of Rhodes, Chios, Samos and Zakynthos.

Sadly, World War II took a devastating toll on the Jews of Greece. Eighty seven percent of Greek Jews perished. As in all countries there were righteous gentiles who risked their lives and the lives of their families to protect their Jewish countrymen from the horrors of the Nazi invaders.

Song of Life tells the story of two of these heroes, Greek Bishop Chrysostomos and the mayor of Zakynthos, Loukas Karrer, who stood up to the Nazis who demanded the names and whereabouts of the Jews of this island.

Formerly presented as part of the exhibit Defying the Devil: Christian clergy Who Helped Jews Escape from the Holocaust, this Film will explore their heroic acts.

The film is in Greek with English subtitles.

Discussion to be led by Former President of the Northeast Queens Jewish Community Council, Joseph Veron.


Artist-in-Residence Arts Initiative

MOTYL Chamber Ensemble
May 16, 2010, 1:00pm

The MOTÝL Chamber Ensemble, formed in 2003, performs music by composers whose lives were cut short or radically transformed by the Holocaust. Some of the composers were fortunate enough to only be forced into exile while the majority lost their lives in the Holocaust. The ensemble's name, Czech for 'butterfly,' is derived from the poem "The Butterfly" written by Pavel Friedman at the Terezín concentration camp.
http://www.motylchamberensemble.org/

Two Generations Later, The Grandchildren Speak

Lecturer: Leora Klein

Sunday, September 9, 2012, at 1:00 PM

3G-NY/WEDU is not just another website. It is a dynamic group of more than 1500 plus members bound together by the fact that they are the grandchildren of Holocaust survivors and their desire to perpetuate the memory of the Holocaust. Leora Klein is the co-founder of 3GNY and the Director of WEDU, We Educate. Through Ms. Klein’s efforts the third generation in the New York Metropolitan area has undertaken a program of education, action and reflection, enabling them to honor its history and leverage personal connections to combat intolerance worldwide.

Ms. Klein teaches English Language and Literature at the Abraham Joshua Heschel School in Manhattan. She has earned a B.A. in English Literature and Theatre Arts from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.A. in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University. Her essays and articles have appeared in numerous publications that include Yad Vashem’s Martyrdom and Resistance Magazine, The New York Sun, the New Jersey Jewish News and The Pennsylvania Gazette.

 

And Then There Were None: The Shoah after Survivors

Lecturer: David Widawsky

Sunday, September 9, 2012, at 1:00 PM

The Shoah ended 67 years ago and the youngest survivors are no longer young. Though many survivors have documented their stories in memoirs, audio and video recordings, nothing can substitute for their firsthand testimonies. Who will tell the stories and pass on the memories when they are no longer able to speak for themselves? Some of the responsibility will fall to museums and educators, but it is the children who grew up with the Shoah and lived with the stories that will serve as eyewitnesses for their parents and grandparents.

David Widawsky was born in Germany after WWII to parents who survived the Lodz Ghetto, Auschwitz, Bergen-Belsen and Dachau. He is retired from a career as an urban planner and has begun a life dedicated to Holocaust Remembrance and Education. He is employed by March of the Living, serves on the Kupferberg Holocaust Center’s Advisory Board and heads the Center’s Second and Third Generation Group. He serves on the board of the Queens Jewish Community Council.

 

Unlocking Sarah's Key: A Collaboration with Evil

Lecturer: Lorraine Barbara Wind

Sunday, May 6, 2012 at 1:00 PM

Since France's Revolution of 1789, which took as its motto, "Liberté, Fraternité, Egalité," conservative elements of French society sought a return to its old regime. Although victorious against Germany in WWI, France found itself threatened by its former foe in 1940. Rather than fight, Marshall Henri Phillipe Pétain, a celebrated hero of that war, viewed this threat as an opportunity to create a new France, one that embraced the values of facism rather than democracy. Under his leadership, the Vichy Regime went beyond Nazi demands to ultimately leave an indelible stain on France's honor. This talk will examine the myths and paradoxes surrounding these shameful historical events that have recently received much attention through films such La Rafle and Sarah's Key.

Barbara Wind has served as the Director of the Holocaust Council of MetroWest for more than a decade. She earned a B.A. in English and an M.A. in Jewish-Christian Studies, served on the Executive Board of the New Jersey Council on the Humanities, the Sister Rose Thering Endowment, and is a Leadership NJ Fellow.

She is a poet, playwright, journalist, teacher and lecturer. Her poems have been published in numerous literary journals: The New Jersey State Commission on Holocaust Education Curriculum and also in JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association. She was a featured poet at the 2000 Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival.

 

History Is Mystery: What Is in the Suitcase?

Lecturer: Rita Scher Dytell

Sunday, June 3, 2012 at 1:00 PM

A couple trying to flee from what would be called the Holocaust arrives in New York in July, 1939. With them is the single suitcase that they were allowed to take.

What story does it tell? What is found within this suitcase and how do the many articles create a story? Who are these individuals? What is revealed of their education, backgrounds and interests? How do these articles serve to project the future of the newcomers in America?

Join with us as we examine the many articles within the suitcase as they each tell a story and develop a biographical and emotional picture of these escapees. Why do they act in a unique manner? What have they lost and what are they seeking?

Rita Scher Dytell earned her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from the City University of New York. She is a Professor of Psychology at the College of Mount Saint Vincent and was Founder and Director of the Allied Health Studies graduate and undergraduate programs. Dr. Dytell participated in the 2006 New Perspectives on the Holocaust Summer Seminar sponsored by the Memorial Library. She has developed and teaches a senior level integrated course on Genocide 2007. She is currently developing and presenting her generic model of genocide.

 

My Race: A Jewish Girl Growing Up Under Apartheid in South Africa, From Shtetl to Apartheid to Freedom

Lecturer: Lorraine Lotzoff Abramson

Sunday, September 25, 2011 at 1:00 PM

At the 1973 Maccabi Games, Lorraine Lotzoff Abramson won a silver and a bronze medal as a runner with the United State's team. That was nowhere near her spectacular success the previous time she'd competed—in 1965—but the event carried a new pleasure: It was her first time representing her new country, a place with a relatively even playing field.

In 1965, she had been a member of the South African team. The wide-eyed 19 year old won gold medals in three racing events—100, 200, and 400 meters. But like so much in her life, the joy was tainted by her return to South Africa's tangled racial politics.

Ms. Abramson's story is a family story. Beginning in the shtetl of Ludza in Latvia, it expands to South Africa and then to the United States. In it she spells out the particular bind that faced Jews in South Africa. They came from the same countries as those in the United States and in the same waves of emigration, driven by pogroms and poverty. Like Americans in the South, they found themselves on the oppressors' side, safely sheltered from the exploitation and misery black people faced.

Some Jews reveled in it. Some were appalled and fought the system. A few went to jail or were deported for that opposition. But most complied with the law afraid of suffering or harming their families.

Her's is a powerful story of searching for one's destiny against a background of anti-Semitism, racism and the desire to excel in a free society.

 

2011, The New Anti-Semitism

Lecturer: Neal Scher, Former Director of
the Justice Department's Nazi Prosecution Office

Sunday, October 16, 2011 at 1:00 PM

More than ever before, those of us who deal within the area of Holocaust education have detected a growing confluence of factors illustrating a rise in anti-Semitism on campuses, directed against cultural organizations and incorporating an effort that does not deny the Holocaust but strives to delegitimize Israel and it's supporters.

As a long–time Director of the Justice Department's Nazi Prosecution Office (OSI), National Executive Director of AI-PAC, President of the American branch of the International Association of Jewish Lawyers and Jurists and an attorney in private practice in Washington, D.C. and New York for over three decades, Neal Sher has been at the forefront of activism on Jewish and Israeli causes.

Most recently, he has filed a federal civil rights case against the University of California at Berkeley on behalf of a Jewish student who was assaulted by a leader of a student Muslim organization, and a complaint with the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal alleging that York University in Toronto has legitimized an environment of anti-Semitism.

These cases and others like them are extremely important as the worldwide campaign to delegitimize and denigrate Israel has targeted campuses in North America as major battlegrounds.

 

"This I Saw and of This I Shall Tell"

Lecturer: Bernhard Storch, Soldier,
Liberator, Voice of Conscience

Sunday, December 11, 2011 at 1:00 PM

In 1940, as a teenager living in Poland, Bernhard Storch soon found himself torn from his family and sent to a Siberian labor camp by the invading Russian army. After two years, Storch enlisted in the First Infantry Division of the Polish Army and began a battle ordeal that would take him through the battlefields of Europe and into Berlin.

In his diary, he writes… "I helped to liberate the extermination camps in Poland of Sibibor and, Majdanek. I had no knowledge or warning of the unforgettable, shocking, devastating sights I would see. Thousands of victims were barely alive. After seeing what I had to at this point, my hope of seeing my family again had dwindled away."

Brernhard Storch saw what no human should have seen, the full brunt of the Holocaust. In his military service, he received seven major awards from the Polish army. He was discharged in 1945, married, left Poland in 1946 and arrived in New York City in 1947. Bernhard Storch vividly presents the soldier's view of the horrors committed against both Christians and Jews. He spoke before a special session of the United Nations on the 60th anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi death camps.

He has lectured to such unique groups as the United States Military Academy at West Point, the United States Coast Guard and to groups of Polish teachers in a program sponsored by the United States State Department.

 

SONG OF LIFE (To Tragoudi Tis Zios)
The Righteous Gentiles of the Holocaust in Greece– a film
Discussion with Joseph Varon
Sunday, March 13, 2011 at 1 PM

The presence of Jews in Greece traces their roots back to ancient times. These Greek Jews known as Romaniotes, spoke Greek (Judeo – Greek) and developed their own culture and customs within the confines of the Byzantine Empire. They lived and flourished on the main land of Greece as well as the islands of Rhodes, Chios, Samos and Zakynthos.

Sadly, World War II took a devastating toll on the Jews of Greece. Eighty seven percent of Greek Jews perished. As in all countries there were righteous gentiles who risked their lives and the lives of their families to protect their Jewish countrymen from the horrors of the Nazi invaders.

Song of Life tells the story of two of these heroes, Greek Bishop Chrysostomos and the mayor of Zakynthos, Loukas Karrer, who stood up to the Nazis who demanded the names and whereabouts of the Jews of this island.

Formerly presented as part of the exhibit Defying the Devil: Christian clergy Who Helped Jews Escape from the Holocaust, this Film will explore their heroic acts.

The film is in Greek with English subtitles.

Discussion to be led by Former President of the Northeast Queens Jewish Community Council, Joseph Veron.


Artist-in-Residence Arts Initiative

MOTYL Chamber Ensemble
May 16, 2010, 1:00pm

The MOTÝL Chamber Ensemble, formed in 2003, performs music by composers whose lives were cut short or radically transformed by the Holocaust. Some of the composers were fortunate enough to only be forced into exile while the majority lost their lives in the Holocaust. The ensemble's name, Czech for 'butterfly,' is derived from the poem "The Butterfly" written by Pavel Friedman at the Terezín concentration camp.
http://www.motylchamberensemble.org/

An Orthodox Jewish Kibbutz in Northern Ireland: A Tale of the Kindertransport

Lecturer: Robert Sugar
Sunday, October 24, 2010 1:00pm

In the springof 1939, the Jewish community of Belfast, Northern Ireland leased an abandoned farm for twenty years that was to serve as both a training farm and refuge for Zionist pioneers (halutzim) from Germany and Austria. That May, thirty young men and women of the orthodox Bachad movement arrived to begin their training as pioneers headed for Palestine. The next group to arrive that summer was thirty children of the Kindertransport. By the beginning of the war, with the arrival of twenty older refugees, the farm was a full-fledge community of eighty. It was renamed the Refugee Settlement Farm, Millisle, in Northern Ireland. Located on seventy acres, the farm became a success.

Among the children on the Kindertransport was eight-year-old Robert Sugar from Vienna. Initially placed in the Belfast Jewish Refugee Hostel, he was shortly transferred to the Millisle Refugee Farm on the seacoast of County Down. He attended school in Millisle and in his spare time worked in the fields. Robert would go on to win a scholarship at a prestigious Grammar School. This experience in this self-sustaining Jewish farming village, the separation from his family, and his nine years as a member of the Millisle Farm formed his future and presents a unique and compelling story.

Robert Sugar has served as a graphic artist and book designer in leading New York publishing houses. He leads his own design studio, Book-works. He has written extensively in designing educational media for programs in Jewish history.

 

Lazar Kaganovich, the Wolf of the Kremlin, Stalin's Anti-Semite, My Uncle: A Family Story

Lecturer: Stuart Kahan, Former U.S. Member Central Intelligence Agency
Sunday, December 5, 2010 1:00 PM

This is a family story of Stuart Kahan and his uncle Lazar Kaganovich, vice premier under Joseph Stalin. Kahan's Aunt Rosa was married to Stalin and raised his daughter, Svetlana. Another uncle was Commissar of Aviation. Uncle Lazar, as Kahan calls him, was second-in-command to Stalin, orchestrated the purges that caused the deaths of 20 million, built the famed Moscow subway, created the KGB, and was the only Jew in the hierarchy and the most anti–Semitic one of all.

Stuart Kahan traveled to Russia with his father in the 1980s and spoke at great length with his infamous uncle. He was subsequently tossed out of the county and listed as persona non-grata. Kahan details why his Uncle Lazar, Stalin's second-in-command, was so anti-Semitic and what he thought of the Holocaust. This provides a rare glimpse into the anti-Semitic terror brought to bear by Stalin.

Mr. Kahan has been a journalist for forty-nine years including writing for The New York Times and the Philadelphia Bulletin, as well as being editor-in-chief at McGraw-Hill and business editor at Barron's Educational Services. He holds degrees from the Pennsylvania State University and Oxford University. He is the author of sixteen books and specializes in writing about financial services, wealth management and financial, estate, and retirement planning.

Please RSVP at (718) 281-5770.

 

Escaping From the DP Camp

Lecturer: Steve Berger

There is a very moving Yiddish song entitled "Where Shall I Go"? which became all the more poignant after World War II when hundreds of thousands of Holocaust survivors roamed Europe or temporarily resided in the Displaced Persons (DP) camps wrestling with this very question. There was no answer. Home appeared not to be an option as in too may cases it no longer existed. And so began a migration of survivors seeking a new home. The U.S. was one answer; to many others, Palestine was the location of choice. Those survivors who selected Palestine (it was not as yet referred to as Israel), undertook a journey that allowed them to escape from the ravages of the Holocaust only to be faced with the harsh immigration restrictions of the British White Paper.

Steve Berger, a slave laborer from Hungary, became an integral part of a group of dynamic and committed men and women not defeated by the Holocaust and ready to finally bring the remnants of the Jewish people to their own country. With military precision these men and women crisscrossed the world marshalling both human and material resources to bring those who had survived the inferno of the Holocaust and now resided in DP camps to "the promised land." This major operation known as the "Bricha" was designed to put pressure on the British and the world, to openup Palestine, and return the Jews to their homeland.

Now a resident of Queens and a volunteer at the Kupferberg Holocaust Center, Steve Berger relates the story of the Bricha and the clandestine operations that transpired to give the survivors of Europe a free nation.

 

"Samuel Bak on Time, Tradition and Tikkun Olam"

May 2, 2010, 10:30am
Lecture by Ayala Tamir

 

“No One Ever Died Illegally in Auschwitz: The Nazi Obsession with Legalizing the Holocaust”

April 25, 2010, 1:00pm
Lecture by Dr. Harry Reicher

The Nazi Holocaust represented the ultimate in sheer, brutal lawlessness. Yet the Nazi regime in Germany, went to extraordinary lengths to legalize what it was doing, thereby creating the oxymoron, pseudo-legal terror. This presentation will examine the perversion of the country’s legal system, in both its legislative and judicial aspects, and the conversion of both into savage instruments designed to discriminate against, ostracize, dehumanize, and ultimately eliminate certain classes of people, Jews first and foremost. This is a little-known dimension of the Holocaust, one that added another weapon to the armory trained by the Nazis against their victims, and that prompted the court in the trial of the Nazi lawyers and judges at Nuremberg to summarize, very powerfully: “The dagger of the assassin was concealed beneath the robe of the jurist.”

Yom Hashoah Lecture Series

"Contemporary Genocidal Anti-Semitism in a Time of Silence"

April 11, 2010, 10:00am
Lecture by Dr. Charles Asher Small

Dr. Charles Asher Small, Director and Founder of the Yale Initiative for the Interdisciplinary Study of Anti-Semitism (YIISA) will speak about the Revolutionary Iranian Regime, Hamas and Hezbollah and the silence in the United States.

 

"Anti-Semitism and Other Security Threats to the Jewish Community in the United States."

February 7, 2010 1pm
Lecture by Dr. Joshua Gleis

 

"Non-European Jews During the Holocaust: The Long Reach of the Nazis"

March 14, 2010, 1:00pm
Lecture by Dr. Mitchell Serels

While most historians concentrate their research on the Holocaust in Europe, a long shadow was cast by the Nazi regime over North Africa, Japanese held areas in Asia, work camps and in Tunisia and Libya and non-European Jewish residing in France. Rabbi Dr. Serels has written extensively on the Jews communities of North Africa as well as their status in World War II and is known as author of the Sephardim and the Holocaust. He is a well-known contributor of research to the forthcoming Encyclopedia of Jews in the Islamic World.

 

The Third Reich Comes to Long Island
Lecturer: Marvin D. Miller

Sunday, December 6, 2009 at 1 PM

“You will meet people who think like you do,” states the brochure distributed by Camp Siegfried, one of the many summer camps created by the Nazi party. While this was a typical summer camp run by the Nazis, it stands out for the uniqueness of its location YAPHANK, LONG ISLAND!

Established by the Nazi-American Bund to spread the word of Nazism in the United States, the camp attracted a wide following of pro-Nazi Americans. On summer weekends as the Long Island Railroad pulled into the Yaphank station, they were greeted by over 40,000 such comrades who marched up the Nazi-named streets of the camp, chanting the Horst Wessel Lie with the chilling words

When Jewish blood drips from the knife
Then will the German people prosper

Coupled with this robust singing, these summer troopers would parade down the Nazi-named streets of the camp.

While it was short-lived, Camp Siegfried demonstrates the significant feeling of pro-Nazi America prior to the start of American involvement in the war.

Marvin D. Miller is an instructor of History at Suffolk Community College. His publications include, Wunderlich’s Salute, the Story of Camp Siegfried and Terminating the Socially Inadequate. He has also lectured on Holocaust Loot: Stolen Art and Bank Assets, The Spanish Civil War and Americans and the Armenian Genocide.

 

The Predictability of Genocide: The Case of Rwanda

Friday, December 4, 2009 , 12:00pm - 2:00pm

Special Guest Speaker
Dr. Cynthia L. Kamikazi

Followed by Panel Discussion Including:
Galen D. Kirkland, Commissioner, NY State Division of Human Rights
Dr. Sarah Danielsson, Assistant Professor of History, QCC
Dr. Emily Tai, Associate Professor of History, QCC

Click Here for More Info

 

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