DAN-111 Syllabus

Syllabus

Department:

Health, Physical Education and Dance

Course:

Department

Hours & Credits:

3 class hours, 3 credits

Course Description

A study of dance as an art form. Includes an introduction to theories and styles of dance from primitive cultures to avant-garde. Relationship of dance to music, fine art, and theater discussed and clarified through film showings, selected readings, and attendance at dance performances. No previous experience required.


Curricula For Which This Course Is Required:

May be used to fulfill requirements for graduation in the Liberal Arts and Sciences degree programs (A.A. and A.S.), and certain others. May also be used to fulfill elective credits in liberal arts and sciences.


Educational Objectives

Educational Objectives
Educational Objective Brief description of course activities which help students to meet each of the educational objectives
A. Communicate effectively through viewing dance, writing, listening, and speaking Students are required to attend two dance concerts and write two reaction papers in response to the concerts.
B. Apply aesthetic and intellectual criteria in the evaluation or creation of works in the humanities or the arts Students view a multiplicity of dance films from a variety of genres throughout history and are asked to respond to a series of questions to interpret and asses the similarities and differences between forms. After having learned the canon of western concert dance, students are asked to view a more contemporary piece of choreography to evaluate how the historic work influences the newer work. They must present examples to support their conclusions.
examples to support their conclusions. C. Integrate knowledge and skills in their program of study. Students view DVDs of choreography and are asked to discuss and interpret the meaning in relationship to the choreographer's intent. Through mid-terms and final exams, students must demonstrate knowledge of different choreographic points of view and creative processes presented during the course.

Course Objectives: Desired Student Learning

  1. To introduce the student to Western Dance (Ballet & Modern) as a means of communication as an art form.

  2. To stimulate intellectual curiosity about dance history.

  3. To evaluate and write critically about dance performances

  4. To develop an awareness of choreographic forms, styles and creative spirit.

  5. To enrich the student’s knowledge of the related arts, i.e. music and the visual arts.

  6. To enable the student to better enjoy, appreciate and understand a dance performance as a spectator.


Student Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes
Course Objectives Learning Outcomes
1. To introduce the student to Western Dance (Ballet & Modern) as a means of communication as an art form. Students view a multiplicity of dance films from a variety of genres throughout history and are asked to respond to a series of questions to interpret and asses the similarities and differences between forms.
2. To stimulate intellectual curiosity about dance history. After having learned the canon of western concert dance, students are asked to view a more contemporary piece of choreography to evaluate how the historic work influences the newer work. They must present examples to support their conclusions.
3. To evaluate and write critically about dance performances Students are required to attend two dance concerts and write two reaction papers in response to the concerts.
4. To develop an awareness of choreographic forms, styles and creative spirit. Students view DVDs of choreography and are asked to discuss and interpret the meaning in relationship to the choreographer's intent.
5. To enrich the student’s knowledge of the related arts, i.e. music and the visual arts. Through mid-terms and final exams, students must demonstrate knowledge of different choreographic points of view and creative processes presented during the course.
6. To enable the student to better enjoy, appreciate and understand a dance performance as a spectator. Students evaluate audience and dance critics' responses to choreographers' work both verbally and in written form.

Summary of Main Topics Covered in the Course:

  1. Renaissance

  2. Romanticism

  3. Russian Imperialism

  4. Diaghilev

  5. American Ballet

  6. Isadora Duncan/Denishawn

  7. Martha Graham

  8. Merce Cunningham

  9. Twyla Tharp/Post-Modernism

  10. Alvin Ailey/Paul Taylor – Modern Dance Today


Attendance Policy

In accordance with the College Policy, a student who has more than two absences at the end of the course will receive a WU. Students are expected to arrive on time and be present for the lecture and video portions of the class – there is no partial attendance credit. There are no excused absences.


Methods By Which Student Learning Will Be Evaluated:

  1. Attendance and Participation

  2. Attendance at two Professional Dance Performances (Dance Residency Series at QCC)

  3. Two written critiques of dance performances

  4. One paper involving research

  5. Mid-term and Final Exams


Grading Standards:

A grade of A is given for superlative work that demonstrates a profound commitment to the course material, and further, that goes on to employ this material as a springboard for independent thought and work. A grade of B is given for very good work that completely fulfills all the requirements of the course in a conscientious and dedicated manner, and that demonstrates mastery of the course content. A grade of C is given for work that fulfills all the requirements of the course in a satisfactory manner, but that falls short of demonstrating rigor and mastery. A grade of D is given for work that is unsatisfactory. A grade of F is given for work that fails to fulfill the requirements of the course as listed above


Academic Integrity:

Violations of academic integrity can occur in a number of ways. Acts of academic dishonesty include (the complete listing with definitions and examples is included in the main body of the QCC Academic Integrity code):

  1. Plagiarism – the inclusion of someone else’s words, ideas or data as one’s own work without acknowledging the source.

  2. Fabrication – the use of invented information or the falsification of research or other findings.

  3. Cheating – an act or an attempted act of deception by which students seek to misrepresent that they have mastered information on an academic exercise that they have not mastered.

  4. Academic Misconduct – any act to gain an undue academic benefit for oneself or to cause

    academic harm to another.

  5. Any other serious violations of academic integrity as established by the professor.

Campus Cultural Centers

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