History Courses

HIST-110 Introduction to Ancient Civilization

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

A historical survey of the development of the ideas and  institutions in Ancient China, India, the Near East, Greece, and Rome. Emphasis is on their political, economic, social, legal, religious, cultural, and intellectual achievements. Consultation of primary sources in translation.

HIST-111 Introduction to Medieval and Early Modern Western Civilization

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The development of Western civilization from the beginning of the Middle Ages to the French Revolution; the major political, intellectual, religious, economic, and social movements which transformed Western civilization from a medieval to a modern society. Materials drawn from texts and original sources.

HIST-112 Introduction to Modern Western Civilization

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The development of Western civilization from the French Revolution. Major political, economic, intellectual, social, and scientific forces considered. Focus is on the impact of major ideologies - including liberalism, socialism, and nationalism, as well as the emergence of totalitarianism. Readings include textual and original source material.

HIST-127 Growth of American Civilization I: Colonial Period Through Reconstruction

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The development of American civilization examined from its origins through the aftermath of the Civil War. Deals with vital political, economic, social, and cultural forces and institutions. The Revolutionary era, the Constitutional period, the Jacksonian, Civil War, and reconstruction eras, and such developments as sectionalism, nationalism, and industrialization are surveyed. Readings include textual and original source materials.

HIST-128 Growth of American Civilization II: Reconstruction to the Present

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The development and growth of modern American civilizations examined. Emphasis is on social. political, cultural, and economic forces that have shaped the nation, concentrating on both internal developments and the roots of American expansion abroad. Themes discussed include immigration, nativism, the changing role of women, the Great Depression, the New Deal, America's wars, the United States as a world leader, civil rights and the growth of popular cultures. Readings include textual and original source materials.

HIST 132: World History since 1500

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course focuses on the history of globalization since 1500 and takes a look at 20th century events (Great War, Second World War, Cold War) from a global perspective. Due to the fact that these events are usually covered from a Western, namely European or US, perspective, this course will focus on regions that are usually overlooked. It will deal, for example, with Africa, the Middle East and South and Southeast Asia. The students will learn about the origins of our multicultural world in the 21st century and analyze culture based stereotypes and prejudices. Besides political and economic questions, the role of world religions and the big -isms (Colonialism, Nationalism, and Imperialism) will be explained and discussed.

HIST-133 Introduction to Modern East Asian Civilizations

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course is a survey of the history of East Asia, and will examine the social, cultural, political, economic, and diplomatic development of the region, including China, Japan, Korea and Vietnam. Topics of discussion include the impact of Western imperialism, strategies of modernization, the rise of nationalism, Asian communist movements, World War II, the Cold War and Post Cold War Era.

HIST-135 History of New York State

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

Survey of the political, social, economic, and cultural history of the Empire State from colonial times to the modern era. Analysis of the forces and conditions that have made New York the financial and cultural capital of the United States. Secondary sources are supplemented by primary sources such as maps, diaries, journals, letter and government documents.

HIST-136 African-American History

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

Survey of major developments in the history of Africans in America from the colonial era to the present day. Themes wil include changes in the legal status of Africans in America, evolving ideas about racial identity, and the politics of civil rights. Topics will include the economics of slavery, African cultural survival, and the roles of religion and family in black communities. Major events surveyed include the Civil War, Reconstruction, the Great Migration, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Movement, the Black Power Movement, and recent changes in black America due to immigration.

HIST-140 Latin American History I; Ancient Times to Independence (1500BC-1825)

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The course is a survey of Latin American and Caribbean history from pre-Columbian times through the age of exploration, conquest, and colonization. The course will examine the social, political, economic, and cultural institutions of the Aztec, Mayan, and Inca civilizations as well as those of the Spanish and Portuguese, English, French and Dutch Empires. Special emphasis will be given to the conflicts between indigenous and European cultures, their fusion and the emergence of a new and distinct Latin American civilization.

HIST-141 Latin American History II: Independence to the Present

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The course is a survey of Latin American and Caribbean history from Independence (1800) to the present. The course will focus on problems of nation-building, caudillismo, modernization, social change and cultural development. The experience of individual states will be examined, but specific emphasis will be given to the events and developments that are representative of continental-wide trends.

HIST-152 Women in World History: From Prehistoric Times to the Present

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

A comparative historical exploration of women's roles in public and private life in various world societies from the Paleolithic era to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the contribution women have made to political, intellectual, economic, and social developments within diverse cultures. Topics discussed will include: male and female perceptions of sex roles and gender norms in various societies; women's roles within the family; modes of social, economic, and political participation for women outside the family; female education, and gynecological knowledge. Readings will be drawn from a wide array of primary sources, as well as important secondary literature.

HIST-154 History of Health Care

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

Focus is on the changing conceptions of health and the process of defining and treating disease within the Western world. Includes a brief survey of primitive, ancient, and medieval heritage in health care. Concentrates on the period since the seventeenth century, encompassing American as well as European development. Topics include the history of public health, epidemiology, and teh role of nursing in health care.

HIST-178, 179 Special Topics in History

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course is designed to enhance student understanding in an area not covered by current department offerings. Topics may change each semester, depending upon student and instructor interest. Course descriptions will be available in the Department of History office before registration. Students may repeat this course for credit, but may not repeat the same topic.

HIST-186 Legal History I

3 class hours 3 Credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course examines the ideological, intellectual, and practical development of laws, legal theory, and justice systems in various societies from the Ancient World to the Early Modern period. Using primary and secondary sources, the course discusses the historical context in which legal theory and practice developed and flourished, as well the global impacts of the spread of European legal systems during the Age of Exploration.

HIST-187 Legal History II

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

 This course examines the ideological, intellectual, and practical development of laws, legal theory, and justice systems in various countries and internationally from the Enlightenment through the present. The course discusses the historical context in which these legal theory and practice developed and flourished, as well the global impacts of the development of International Law and International Courts in the wake of the Second World War and Decolonization.

HIST-193 History of the US-Mexico Borderlands in Perspective

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

 Borderlands are areas where nation states meet one another. There are many borderlands the world over, and many of them share similar problems and challenges for their respective governments. Since they are all by definition frontier zones and they often elude state surveillance, such highly diverse actors as cattle rustlers, Indians, runaway slaves, grasping caudillos, and drug runners appear often in borderlands histories. In this class, we will compare the history of borderlands across Latin America and pay particular attention to the U.S.-Mexico border. Through examining secondary texts, official government documents, and even the songs and stories authored by border people themselves, we will unravel the immensely complicated and troubled history of these borderlands. 

HIST-203 Economic History of the Ancient World

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course offers an introduction to key problems in the economic history of the ancient Greek and Roman worlds.  The course emphasizes the connections between individuals’ economic strategies and the social, political, and economic institutions in which those individuals were embedded; it does so by exploring how factors like gender, slavery, and sociability affected trade, manufacture, and agriculture.  The course also examines key questions of performance:  to what extent could the economies of the ancient world generate intensive growth, and who benefitted from any resultant gains?

HIST-204 Topics in the History of Slavery

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

 This course explores slavery in its social, cultural, and economic contexts. Each semester may focus on different time periods. The problems to be investigated include the origins and development of chattel slavery in theses societies; the impact of slave systems on the socio-economic structures and cultures of their host societies; the effort of slaves to exercise agency through accommodation of resistance; and the role and frequency of manumission in various societies.

HIST-205 The First World War, 1914-1918

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

 This course examines the history and impact of this seminal catastrophe of the twentieth century: the First World War, 1914-1918. This course examines the history, as well as cultural, ideological and intellectual impact of the war. It focuses on Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the United States as well as on the revolutions that were caused by the war. The course discusses the historical context in which the war was fought and ended as well as how it impacted the history of the decades to follow the events of 1914-1918.

HIST-206 History of the Second World War

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The course will examine the Second World War from a global perspective and include land, sea, and aerial operations. It will examine the battles and campaigns of the war, as well as the experiences of civilians behind the lines. It will encompass the war's cultural, diplomatic, economic, political, social, and technological dimensions, as well as postwar issues.

HIST-207 The Greeks and the Persians

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

 This course examines through comparison the history of two of the most influential civilizations in world history: the ancient Greeks and Persians. Discussions of the historical context will address how these civilizations developed and flourished, as well as the global impact of the achievements and ideas of these civilizations that are still to be felt today in many regions around the world.

HIST-208 The Romans and their Empire

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course surveys some of the major developments and problems in Roman history, with particular emphasis on the period between the third century BCE and the second century CE.  Although the course covers diverse array of topics, ranging from social and demographic history to slavery, many of the lectures and discussions concentrates on the way in which the development and articulation of Roman imperial power affected general historical trends over this period.

HIST-209 The Barbarians: From the Roman Empire

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course discusses the different groups that modern historians and contemporaries have called ‘barbarians,’ from the later Roman Empire through the Middle Ages to the early modern period. Topics to be considered include definitions of barbarians, the role of barbarians in the fall of the Roman Empire, barbarian identity and the creation of barbarian states, later barbarian groups such as the Vikings and Mongols, and finally early modern Europeans as barbarians in China and Japan.

HIST-211 History of Early Christianity

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course examines the origins of Christianity, from the life and death of the historical Jesus in the first century to the Christianization of the Roman world in the fourth and fifth centuries.  The course discusses the historical context of the development of and acceptance, or rejection, of major Christian beliefs, as well the effects of Roman persecution and ultimately acceptance on Christianity and the effects of Christianity on Roman culture and society.

HIST-212 Pirates and the Sea

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course surveys the maritime history of the world by focusing on the history of maritime theft, or piracy, as a means to investigate the history of sea-borne trade; maritime aggression; littoral communities; and international law.  Course readings will draw from a range of primary sources, including narrative histories; legal texts; and works of fiction, as well as selected readings from scholarly writing on the history of overseas trade, exploration, piracy, maritime warfare; and maritime law.

HIST-218 Ancient Greek History

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The course surveys the development of Ancient Greece from the Bronze Age to the end of the Classical Period, discussing politics (For example, the origin of democracy), culture (For example, the origin of drama) and intellectual history. Reference will also be made to the influence of other advanced civilizations on Greece. Readings will be drawn from primary and secondary source material.

HIST-219 History of the Mediterranean

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course surveys the history of Mediterranean society from ancient times to the present.   Among topics to be included will be: geo-political; environmental and cultural diversity around the Mediterranean; war, commercial, political and religious rivalries; religious and ethnic traditions; social practices; and slavery.  Special attention will be dedicated to primary source documents, and historiography.

HIST-222 Europe and the World Since 1945

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

A survey of Europe's political, economic, and cultural role in the post-war world. Topics include: characteristics of modern industrialization, the politico-economic and social changes of the "Third World", the population explosion and the depletion of natural resources, terrorism and revolution, nuclear proliferation.

HIST-223 History of the Cold War

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course examines the history, as well as cultural, ideological and intellectual impact of the events between 1945 and 1991. It will focus on Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the United States as well as on the economic, political, and social impacts that were caused by the Cold War. The course discusses the historical context in which the Cold War was fought and ended. 

HIST-226 Women in America

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

An analysis of women in the history of American civilization. Examines the impact of changes in the economy, technology, law, culture, and society on the status of women and explores women's perceptions of themselves. Among topics considered are the work roles of women, the historical experience of women of differing classes and ethnic groups, women and reform in the nineteenth century, the political activity of women before and after the nineteenth amendment to the Constitution, and current feminist movements.

HIST-227 British History since 1688

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course provides a survey of British history from the Glorious Revolution of 1688 to today. Topics will include the development of parliamentary supremacy over the monarchy, the political, social and cultural interconnections between the English, Scots and Irish, the Industrial Revolution, the rise and fall of the British Empire, the impact of two world wars and the development of the postwar welfare state.  

HIST-236 History of Germany

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

A history of the German-speaking areas of central Europe with special focus on the time period since 1870. Topics include the first unification, the two world wars, Nazism, the Holocaust, and the contemporary Federal Republic.

HIST-238 History of Russia

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

A history of the Russian state in modern times with special emphasis on the revolutionary and Soviet periods. Topics include the rise of Russian power, imperial government, Lenin, the two world wars, Stalin, Soviet economic development and decay, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and post-Soviet Russia. 

HIST-239 Recent American Civilization

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

Concentration on the major forces which have shaped and influenced American life since 1945. Dynamics of our contemporary society, including the economic and cultural factors as well as the significant developments, with a view toward trying to understand how American values and the elements of a diverse nation relate to its role among other powers.

HIST-240 Environmental History of North America

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite; English 101

This course explores how human relations with the nonhuman world—including land, plants, water, wildlife, minerals, and disease—have helped inform, mediate, and shape broader social, political, economic, and cultural developments in North America and the United States from the pre-contact period to the recent past.  The course examines the multiple ways in which human understandings, manipulations, and uses of the non-human, “natural” world—often resulting in unintended yet damaging consequences—have helped effect historical change over space and time.  

HIST-242 Modern Japan, 1868-1989

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course examines the history, as well as cultural, ideological and intellectual impact of the events between 1868 and 1989. The course focuses on modern Japan’s role in East Asia and the world as well as on the economic, political, and social impacts that were caused by developments that took place there. Discussions include the historical context in which modern Japan was created and in which way its historical developments impacted the world.

HIST-244 Modern Economic History

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

History of the global economy from the development of capitalism to contemporary economic issues including finance, trade, industrialism, energy, and business organization. Readings will be drawn from primary and secondary source material.

HIST-247 History of the Modern Middle East

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course examines the history, as well as cultural, ideological and intellectual impact of the events between 1795 and 2011. The course focuses on the Modern Middle East’s role in the world as well as on the economic, political, and social impacts that were caused by developments that took place there. The course discusses the historical context in which the Modern Middle East developed and in which ways it has impacted on the world. 

HIST-250 Greek and Roman Mythology

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The course gives a survey of Greek and Roman myths and their historical background. The myths will be analyzed and discussed and the results will be placed in the context of their invention and their use by different periods and civilizations. This overview of different civilizations will show especially the Eastern origins of many Greek and Roman myths and their influence on Western Civilizations. Throughout the course reference will be made to the adaptation of ancient Green and Roman myths today.

HIST-253 War and Warfare in Western History: From Gunpowder to Desert Storm

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The course surveys the evolution of warfare from Feudal times to the era of total war and the nuclear age. It will examine the nature of war, how it is used by the state to promote its interests, and how war impacts human society, its economy and political institutions. A number of major battles from different periods will be analyzed with a view to understanding how strategy, battle-field tactics, as well as military organization and training, change in response to new technology and weapons.

HIST-264 American Cities

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course examines the development of America’s cities and suburbs from the Civil War through the present.  The course looks at the dramatic transformation of the United States from predominantly rural society to a majority urban nation and its consequences.  This includes the challenges of population growth and slum development, the influence of federal and municipal government on urban and suburban development, racial and class segregation, the evolution of urban cultures, the threat of ‘violence’ and ‘disorder,’ and in the last four decades, the impact of deindustrialization, globalization, and gentrification.  Readings are a combination of primary sources and historical monographs. 

HIST-265 The European Renaissance

3 class hours  3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The course will analyze the political, economic, social, cultural, religious, and gender history of the European Renaissance, from approximately 1300 to 1650. The class will focus on the start of the Renaissance in Italy, examine the spread of the Renaissance into Northern Europe, explore the issues involved in new overseas encounters, as well as discuss the religious upheaval of the Reformation and Wars of Religion. A common theme will be grounding larger ideas associated with the Renaissance in the context of the social and cultural lives of men and women throughout European society. The readings for the class will focus on both primary and secondary sources.

HIST-276 Immigration and Ethnic Groups in American History

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

Analyzes the American immigration experience and examines various ethnic groups that came to America; depicts their pre-immigration background and the historical causes of immigration; evaluates the impact of the immigrants on American history and of America upon the immigrants. Among themes to be examined are the historical development of the ghetto and American reception of immigrants.

HIST-281 Nationalism and Identity Politics

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course examines the ideological and intellectual histories of the rise of the Nation-State, Nationalism, and Identity concepts such as the “race” concept.  The course discusses the historical context in which these ideologies developed and flourished, as well as the global impact of the rise of these new forms of identity and the ways in which these identities have been politicized for various purposes.

HIST-290 The Holocaust

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

A study of the origins, events, results of and reactions to the Holocaust. Among topics discussed are: the sources of anti-Semitism found in antiquity, the Middle Ages, and early modern Europe; racism in the nineteenth century; the development of the modern German state; the rise of Nazism, the ghetto, Jewish resistance, and Christian efforts to aid the Jews; the world's reaction to the Holocaust; the effects on the survivors and their children; the literature of and the literary responses to the Holocaust and historical parallels. Readings include texts and literary and historical sources; films and eyewitness testimony are a significant part of the course.

HIST-291 History of Genocide in the Twentieth Century

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

Major political, economic, intellectual, social, and scientific factors are considered in order to understand the cause and nature of genocides in a global setting. The course traces the development of the concept of 'Race" and the ideas and practices of annihilation and extermination in the twentieth century. Case-studies of, and comparisons amongst, genocides from 1890 to the present construct a global history of the twentieth century in the context of genocide. Readings will be drawn from primary and secondary source material.

HIST-292 Fascism, Nazism, Communism

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

This course examines the ideological and intellectual histories of the most impactful totalitarian ideologies and political practices of the twentieth century: Fascism in Italy, Nazism in Germany, and Communism in Soviet Russia and China.  The course discusses the historical context in which these ideologies developed and flourished, as well the global impacts of the regimes that practiced them in the twentieth century. 

HIST-295 Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

3 class hours 3 credits

Pre-/co-requisite: English 101

The historical development of the three major Western religions. Among the topics to be discussed are: the relationships of the religions to the civilizations that encompassed them, major institutional developments, and the impact of modernity on their beliefs and practices.

Campus Cultural Centers

Kupferberg Holocaust CenterOpens in a new window
Kupferberg Holocaust Resource Center and ArchivesOpens in a new window

Using the lessons of the Holocaust to educate current and future generations about the ramifications of unbridled prejudice, racism and stereotyping.

Queensborough Performing Arts CenterOpens in a new window
QPAC: Performing Arts CenterOpens in a new window

QPAC is an invaluable entertainment company in this region with a growing national reputation. The arts at QPAC continues to play a vital role in transforming lives and building stronger communities.

Queensborough Art GalleryOpens in a new window
QCC Art GalleryOpens in a new window

The QCC Art Gallery of the City University of New York is a vital educational and cultural resource for Queensborough Community College, the Borough of Queens and the surrounding communities.