Courses and Outlines

CH-101 LIVING IN A CHEMICAL WORLD (Syllabus)

This is a lecture course with hands-on laboratory experiments where the role of chemistry in everyday processes is highlighted and discussed. Topics covered include: The chemistry of food and medicines, vitamins and minerals, water and air, household products and fuels. The approach is non-mathematical and strives towards making chemistry stimulating and relevant to daily life. The goal is to introduce the applied aspects of chemistry to non-science majors, explain the world we live in, and to aid students to become more educated consumers and citizens. The Writing Intensive section includes writing assignments centered around these topics.

Successful completion of CH-101 satisfies the Life and Physical Sciences General Educations Core Requirement. To satisfy the laboratory science requirement for the A.A. degree, students are required to take the associated laboratory class CH-102. May not be used as part of the Mathematics or Science Concentration required in the A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum.

CH-102 LIVING IN A CHEMICAL WORLD LABORATORY (Syllabus)

This laboratory course should be taken with CH-101 (Living in a Chemical World lecture). The role of chemistry in everyday life is highlighted and explored. Basic experimental design and analysis are studied. Methods are introduced for the analysis of food, medicines, and household products. Laboratory techniques such as synthesis, titrations, chromatography, use of the spectrophotometer, and Geiger- Muller counter are employed.

Successful completion of CH-101 and CH-102 satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree. May not be used as part of the Science or Mathematics Concentration required in the A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum.

CH-103 CHEMISTRY AND THE ARTS (Syllabus)

This course offers a general background in the connections between chemistry and the arts. Topics include light absorption and reflection; the nature of color; additive and subtractive color mixing; separation of mixtures;  properties of paints and pigments; preservation and authentication of art objects;  common chemical hazards; and the principles of photography.

Either CH 106 or a combination of CH 103 and 104 meets requirements for the A.A.S. degree in Digital Art and Design and are recommended for students in programs offered by the Art and Photography Department. These courses may not be used as part of the Mathematics or Science concentration in A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum and is not open to students who have completed CH-151, CH-152, CH-251 or CH-252.

CH-104 CHEMISTRY AND THE ARTS LABORATORY (Syllabus)

This laboratory applies chemical theory and techniques to practices involved in creating works of art. Students use modern laboratory instrumentation and methods such as chromatography to make and examine materials used in art.

Not open to students who have completed CH-151, CH-152, CH-251 or CH-252.

Either CH-106, Chemistry and the Arts (lecture and laboratory combined) or CH-104 and CH 103 is required for the A.A.S. degree in Digital Art and Design and is recommended for students in programs offered by the Art and Design Department. This course may not be used as part of the Mathematics or Science concentration in A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum and is not open to students who have completed CH-151, CH-152, CH-251 or CH-252.

CH-106 CHEMISTRY AND THE ARTS (Syllabus)

This course offers a general background in the connections between chemistry and the arts. Topics include light absorption and reflection; the nature of color; additive and subtractive color mixing; separation of mixtures; properties of paints and pigments; preservation and authentication of art objects;  common chemical hazards; and the principles of photography. The laboratory component applies chemical theory and techniques to practices involved in creating works of art. Students use modern laboratory instrumentation and methods such as chromatography to make and examine materials used in art.

This course is required for the A.A.S. degree in Digital Art and Design and is recommended for students in programs offered by the Art and Design Department. This course satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the A. A. degree. Completing CH-106 is equivalent to completing CH-103 and CH-104. This course may not be used as part of the Mathematics or Science concentration in A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum and is not open to students who have completed CH-151, CH-152, CH-251 or CH-252.

CH-110 CHEMISTRY AND THE ENVIRONMENT (Syllabus)

Air, water, nuclear, pesticide, noise, and solid waste pollution discussed in terms of sources, effects, and control. Basic principles introduced as needed.

CH-111 ENVIRONMENT LABORATORY (Syllabus)

An environmental chemistry laboratory course that should be taken with CH-110 (Chemistry and the Environment lecture). The role of chemistry in environmental processes is highlighted and explored. Basic experimental design and analysis are studied. Methods are introduced for the determination of some aspects of air and water quality. Laboratory techniques such as titrations, chromatography, use of the spectrophotometer, and Geiger- Muller counter are employed in pollutant determinations.

Successful completion of CH-110 and CH-111 satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree. May not be used as part of the Science or Mathematics Concentration required in the A.S. in Liberal Arts and Sciences curriculum.

CH-115 INTRODUCTION TO NANOSCIENCE (Syllabus)

This course will give students an introduction to nanoscience, which is a rapidly growing field in our society. The synthesis of nanomaterials, the tools used to characterize these materials (Electron Microscopy (SEM/TEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) and UV-Vis spectroscopy), and societal impacts of nanomaterials/technology (such as, ethical, legal, environmental implications) will be covered. Students will select a nanomaterial of interest and also do a term paper and presentation.

CH-120 FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY (Syllabus: C5A/C, C5B)

This hybrid lecture and laboratory course covers the most fundamental laws, theories, and principles of general chemistry, including classification and properties of matter; measurements; elements and compounds; atomic theory and structure; the periodic table; chemical equations; the mole concept and stoichiometry; chemical bonding; and acids and bases. This course includes five experiments to give students hands-on experience with basic laboratory methods and application of theory. Knowledge of basic mathematics is assumed. Students are strongly encouraged to also take CH-121 (Fundamentals of Chemistry Laboratory).

Successful completion of CH-120 and CH-121 satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the A.A. degree. This course is not open to students who have completed CH-127, 128, 151, 152, 251, or 252.

CH-121 FUNDAMENTALS OF CHEMISTRY LABORATORY (Syllabus)

This laboratory course complements CH-120 (Fundamentals of Chemistry) and provides basic knowledge of modern experimental chemistry. It demonstrates how chemical laws are derived, verified, and applied. It introduces essential laboratory methods and techniques including separations and chromatography; determination of density and melting and boiling points; electrical conductivity of solutions; qualitative analysis; chemical reactions and stoichiometry; pH analysis; and titration. Students are strongly encouraged to take CH-121 while taking CH-120.

Successful completion of CH-120 and CH-121 satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the A.A. degree. This course is not open to students who have completed CH-127, 128, 151, 152, 251, or 252.

CH-127 INTRODUCTORY COLLEGE CHEMISTRY (Syllabus)

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence intended to provide students with basic knowledge of general chemistry. The second semester introduces organic chemistry (CH-128). Topics include units of measurement and dimensional analysis, elements and compounds, atomic structure, chemical bonding and chemical reactions, properties of solutions and chemical equilibrium, acid-base chemistry, physical states and gas laws, intra- and intermolecular forces, and nuclear chemistry. In the laboratory component, students apply the scientific method to explore natural phenomena using basic experimental techniques.

The course is a requirement for the B.S. or B.A. in Nursing, Nutrition, and other Allied Health Professions. It also satisfies the laboratory science requirement for the A.S. in Health Sciences, A.A. in Liberal Arts and Sciences (non-science concentration) and other non-science majors. This course is not open to students who have completed CH-151, CH-152, CH-251, and CH-252.

CH-128 INTRODUCTORY ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (Syllabus)

This course is the second of a two-semester sequence and is intended to provide a brief, but thorough introduction to organic chemistry and biochemistry. The major functional groups such as hydrocarbons, alcohols, amines and carbonyl compounds are studied with some emphasis on nomenclature, reactions, and stereochemistry. Several aspects of organic chemistry related to biochemistry are also stressed including units on amino acids, enzymes, carbohydrates and lipids. The laboratory introduces students to the various synthetic methods for making organic compounds, as well as to purification techniques like distillation, recrystallization and extraction.

This course is recommended for students in Nursing and others planning to pursue careers in the Allied Health fields. It may be used as a preparation for CH-251, but may not be substituted for CH-251 and is not open to students who have already completed CH-251 or CH-252.

CH-151 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I (Syllabus)

This course is the first part of a two-semester sequence that provides students with a fundamental knowledge of the modern theory in general and inorganic chemistry. It covers topics that are essential to many disciplines in science and technology, and the health professions, with an emphasis on developing problem-solving skills. Topics include matter and energy; chemical nomenclature; mass relationships and stoichiometry; reactions in aqueous solutions; gas laws and kinetic molecular theory; atomic structure and quantum theory; periodicity of elements; chemical bonding and molecular structure; states of matter and intermolecular forces; properties of solutions; and colligative properties. Laboratory work provides training in common experimental methods and hands-on application of theory. The students in Honors classes will attend scientific seminars and write a short paper.

CH-152 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II (Syllabus)

This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence that provides students with a fundamental knowledge of the modern theory in general and inorganic chemistry. It covers topics that are essential to many disciplines in science and technology, and the health professions, with an emphasis on developing problem-solving skills. Topics include enthalpy, entropy, and free energy; chemical kinetics; chemical equilibrium in gaseous and aqueous systems; properties and equilibria of acids and bases; buffers and acid-base titrations; solubility and complex ion equilibria; qualitative analysis; electrochemistry and redox reactions; and an introduction to nuclear chemistry. Laboratory work provides training in common experimental methods and hands-on application of theory. The students in Honors classes will give 10-15 minute oral presentations on topics and concepts chosen from the course material. This course makes extensive use of computers and requires the development of scientific communication skills.

CH-251 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I (Syllabus)

The relationship between structure and properties of organic compounds discussed, with emphasis on reaction mechanisms, stereochemistry, and synthesis. Laboratory work involves preparation, isolation, and identification of organic compounds.

CH-252 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II (Syllabus)

A continuation of CH-251, this course develops the relationship between properties and structure of organic compounds in greater detail. In addition, current syntheses, modern mechanisms of organic reactions, and spectroscopic identification of compounds are discussed. The main families of organic compounds of bio-chemical interest and their typical reactions are studied. Laboratory work involves the synthesis, purification, and identification of organic compounds, as well as organic qualitative analysis.

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