Administrator Guide

What is Assessment?

To insure that an institution’s assessment is valid and meaningful, assessment must be a process that is comprehensive, integrated, and sustained.

Comprehensive

  • Assessment is comprehensive when it takes into account all levels and all branches of the institution

Assessment of Institutional Effectiveness

Administrative Assessment of all services in support of student learning

Academic Assessment of Student Learning

Integrated

Assessment is integrated when there is a clear, conceptual alignment among objectives at different but related levels of the institution.

Sustained

Assessment is sustained when the institution at each level has agreed to a timetable for the assessments that occur at each level.


Administrative assessment of services in support of student learning examines the core activities, key performance indicators, projected and actual outcomes, and year-to-year planning impact of all non-teaching departments at the college.

Levels of Assessment image

Department Level

The year-end report template is the organizing document for administrative assessment at the departmental level.

Division Level

The corresponding divisional head receives the department year-end reports for review, consultation, and approval.

A divisional review and approval process allows the institution to identify and respond to strategic needs at a level at which the departmental head alone is not able to respond. For instance, the divisional year-end reports suggest relevant outcomes and/or action plans to help inform the Strategic Planning Completion Report.

Myth: Assessment will be used for evaluation of faculty, administrators, or staff members.

Fact: Assessment is not documentation used for annual reviews or for decisions on promotion or tenure. It is unethical to use assessment results for the purposes of faculty, administrators or staff evaluation.

Myth: Assessment is for faculty.

Fact: Assessment is for everyone! For administration, it enables the institution to identify and respond to strategic needs at a level at which the departmental head alone is not able to respond. For instance, the divisional review suggest relevant outcomes and/or action plans to help inform the Strategic Planning Completion Report.

Myth: There is no real benefit from doing assessment.

Fact: Department assessment is of key importance for a divisional review and approval process.

Myth: Surveys are the only way to assess the students’ perception of the program.

Fact: While surveys are one way to assess the outcomes of services, there are several other methods as well.

Myth: Academic assessment is more significant for student learning than administrative assessment.

Fact: Academic assessment and administrative assessment are both of significant importance to student learning.

What is the Assessment Process?

Design

Plan of Action

Evaluation And
Recommendations

Implementation

Design

The assessment process involves establishing clearly articulated goals and measurable expected outcomes.

  • Systematically gathering, analyzing, and interpreting evidence from the outcomes to determine how well those outcomes have been achieved.
  • Using the resulting information from evidence and discussion to affirm institutional effectiveness or to promote continuous improvement.

The first step to developing an effective assessment is the design. The assessment design is created using the core activities, key performance indicators, projected and actual outcomes, and year-to-year planning.

In the design process, administrative offices/departments develop or select methods to measure outcomes for services in support student learning:

Direct Assessment

Reviewing process of actual samples of student work.

Indirect Assessment

Collection of information through means other than looking at actual samples of student work. These include surveys, exit interviews, and focus groups.

Value-Added Assessment

Evaluation of the impact on student learning as measured by a pretest and posttest.

Rubrics

Method of classifying and categorizing student behaviors or products along a continuum.  Rubrics can be used to assess writing, research reports, performances, portfolios, and problem-solving, among others.

 

Assessment

Faculty