Common Read Events

Sponsored by the Office of Academic Affairs

2012-2013 Common Read 

Featured text:  The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot. 


HeLaBookCover
Approximately forty Queensborough classes, as well as students from Benjamin Cardozo High School, Bayside High School and Francis Lewis High School, will read The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks and participate in activities.  It is the true story of a poor African American woman named Henrietta Lacks whose cells, taken without her knowledge in 1951, became one of the most important tools in medicine. 

Faculty members are invited to particpate in the Common Read Book Club where there will be discussions on the text, dialogue regarding possibilities for cross-curricular connections and brainstorming for events for the spring.  Book Club meetings will be held in LB14 per the following schedule:

Wednesday, October 3, 2012      1:15 pm to 3:00 pm
Thursday, October 11, 2012        2:15 pm to 4:00 pm
Wednesday, October 17, 2012    1:15 pm to 4:00 pm

Scheduled Events:

Mid-January to Mid-March
Kurt R. Schmeller Library Exhibit
Please visit the Library Exhibit which will focus on Black History Month as well as Health Care Research.

Mid-January to Mid-March
Photo Display of HeLa Cells
Outside H350
Please stop by to view our Common Read display of color photos of HeLa cells in anaphase, metaphase, prometaphase, apoptosis, cytokinesis and various stages of mitosis.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013
Drop-In Read Aloud
10:00 am to 2:00 pm
Hosted by:  Susan Madera
Kupferberg Holocaust Resource Center & Archives - Gallery Lecture Room
All are invited to drop-in and read aloud from their copy of "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot.  Feel free to join us for as short or long a time as you wish.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013
Movie Event & Discussion - "Miss Evers' Boys"
10:00 am to 1:00 pm
Kupferberg Holocaust Resource Center & Archives - Gallery Lecture Room
Discussion led by Barbara Blake-Campbell
The true story of the U.S. Government's 1932 Tuskeegee Syphilis experiments in which a group of black test subjects were allowed to die, despite a cure having been developed.  The movie will be followed by a discussion on the Tuskeegee Study.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013
Henrietta Lacks and the Meaning of Death
1:10 pm to 3:00 pm
Kupferberg Holocaust Resource Center & Archives - Gallery Lecture Room
Hosted by: Phillip Pecorino
In the course taught by Professor Pecorino on Death and Dying, Henrietta Lacks made a contribution.  In exploring the many different meanings of human death the use made of the cancer cells from Henrietta Lacks illustrated the limitations of one approach to the meaning of human death.  The presentation in this workshop will raise the issue of the concept of human death and its relation to pronouncing humans to be dead and to the relation of different criteria for human death to different uses for dead human bodies including the transplantation of organs and tissue.

Thursday, February 21, 2013
Movie Event & Discussion - "Gattaca"
1:10 pm to 4:00 pm
Kupferberg Holocaust Resource Center & Archives - Gallery Lecture Room
Discussion led by Jillian Abbott
Set in the not-too-distant future, a less than perfect man assumes the identity of a perfect genetic specimen in order to pursue his dream career.  The movie will be followed by a discussion on science vs. science fiction.

Friday, February 22, 2013
Movie Event - BBC Documentary - "The Way of All Flesh"
10:00 am to 12:00 noon
M136
Hosted by:  Susan Madera
Watch the BBC documentary which Rebecca Skloot discusses in several chapters of her book, "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks."  This documentary follows the story of the cells of Henrietta Lacks. (Although open to all, 230 students from Cardozo High School will attend this event.)

Monday, February 25, 2013
How Does She Do That? - Connecting Cultures, Chronology and Individuals in "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks"
4:00 pm to 6:00 pm
H349
Hosted by: Laurel Harris, Kimberly Banks and Leah Anderst
A roundtable of English faculty will lead a discussionof Rebecca Skloot's approach to writing "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks." This interactive exchange will include an examination of how Skloot uses rhetorical strategies such as logos, ethos and pathos.  We will also explore how she incorporates multiple voices and time periods.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013
Research:  Going Beyond the Associate's Degree
12:10 pm to 1:50 pm
M136
Hosted by:  Alisa Cercone
This event will stress the importance of conducting meaningful research and finding reliable sources as well as focus on how these skills can be carried across the curriculum.

Thursday, February 28, 2013
Red Nails and Be-Bop
1:10 pm to 2:00 pm
LB14
Hosted by:  Mavis Hall
Mavis Hall will initiate a dialogue about the humanity of Henrietta Lacks and how Rebecca Skloot makes this fascinating figure come alive on the page.

Friday, March 1, 2013
Human Guinea Pigs:  Involuntary Medical Experimentation - A Global Perspective"
11:10 am to 1:00 pm
Kupferberg Holocaust Resource Center & Archives - Gallery Lecture Room
Guest Speaker:  Beth Lilach, Senior Director of Education & Community Affairs, Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center
This program will examine involuntary experiments upon human beings in the United States, Europe, Central America and Africa.  We will discuss the ethical implications of forced procedures conducted by medical institutions, governments, and private companies on children, women, people with disabilities, indigenous peoples and the poor.  The presentation will also explore resistance by the victims and their pursuit of justice.

Monday, March 4, 2013
Workshop:  Exploring Career Alternatives in Health
1:10 pm to 2:00 pm
S313
Hosted by:  Gail Patterson, Freshman Coordinator, Health Related Sciences Academy
Participants will be provided with an overview of the vast career opportunities within the Health field.  Strategies and techniques to explore and research specific health careers will be discussed.  A Health Career Ladder, which details the various career pathways and advancements, will be introduced to attendees.

Tuesday, March 5, 2013
Human Subject Research
1:10 pm to 2:00 pm
S112
Hosted by:  Paul Marchese and Cheryl Bluestone
Henrietta Lacks was one of many people who were exploited for scientific research before safeguards were put into place.  The protection of human subjects for research has come a long way since then.  Come discuss the history and latest developments in the protection of human subjects research, including the founding of the IRBs, and why they are important to society and the advancement of science.

Tuesday, March 5, 2013
STEM and Henrietta Lacks
2:10 pm to 3:50 pm
LB14
Hosted by:  Michael Dolan
Students will prepare and deliver three presentations on the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) references found within "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" by Rebecca Skloot.  The first presentation will be on the "rocket science" used to enable the manned space flight that put HeLa cells in orbit, enabling scientists to study the effects of space travel and zero gravity on human cell growth.  The second will be on the physics of nuclear radiation and how HeLa cells were used to study the effects of radiation.  The third will be on the thermodynamics of cryopreservation used to that HeLa cells could be frozed and shipped through the mail.

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities
10:00 am to 12:00 noon
M136
Guest Speaker:  Abraham Aragones, MD, MS, Assistant Attending of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities Service of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Dr. Aragones will be speaking on the genesis of the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Immigrant Health and Cancer Disparities Service's work, the projects under the services wing and how these projects are tailored to help minorities and immigrants.

Wednesday, March 6, 2013
Sociocultural and Health Related Advocacy Issues
1:00 pm to 3:30 pm
S112
Hosted by:  Lorraine Cupelli, Georgina Colalillo, Barbara Rome and Barbara Blake-Campbell
Several groups of student nurses will present findings on issues in "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" with a post-panel discussion for questions and answers.


Wednesday, March 6, 2013
Cell Sampling
1:10 pm to 3:00 pm
M228
Hosted by:  Nidhi Gadura and Areti Tsiola
Details:  There will be two workshops as follows:  1:10 pm to 2:00 pm and 2:00 pm to 3:00 pm.  Each workshop will accommodate 24 students.
Note:  This event is reserved for visiting high school students.
Students will gently scrape their inner cheek cells and learn how to mount them on a slide.  Cells will be stained with Methylene Blue and studied under a microscope.  Students will be able to see the cell membrane and nuclei of their normal cells.  Students will be able to see real HeLa cells (courtesy of our colleagues at Queens College) in culture and on the microscope as well as other pre-stained cells.  There will be a presentation/discussion about the nature of cancerous cells and basic clinical screening tests for their detection.

Thursday, March 7, 2013
Cancer, Genes and Viruses
9:00 am to 9:50 am
S212
Hosted by:  Sara Danzi-Engoron
Henrietta Lacks died of cervical cancer.  Her cancer was caused by genetic mutations resulting from a Human Papilloma Virus, or HPV, infection.  In fact, 90% of sexually active adults become infected with HPV at some point in their lives.  Inthis student presentation, learn about what HPV does, the relationsip between viruses and cancer, and about the HPV caccine currently recommended for children and young adults.

Thursday, March 7, 2013
Cancer and You
1:10 pm to 3:00 pm
S112
Hosted by:  Peter Novick
Guest Speaker:  Alanna Coughlin, M.D., Branford/North Branford Pediatrics, Yale-New Haven Children's Hospital, Attending Yale School of Medicine, Clinical Instructor
Almost everyone knows someone who has been diagnosed with cancer, but do YOU really know what it is?  Do YOU know how to prevent cancer?  Are YOU familiar with the newest cancer treatments?  Join us as we learn about what causes cancer, ways to protect yourself and novel medical advancements from both scientific and medical viewpoints.

Friday, March 8, 2013
Common Read Culminating Event
9:00 am to 12:00 noon
M136
Join us as we celebrate the work of our students participating in Service Learning as part of the Common Read.  Their work will be shared and they will be recognized for their achievements.  Then prepare to sit on the edge of your seats as our faculty and students play "HeLa Jeopardy" based upon "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks."  Our own Jeffrey Schwartz has designed the game and will host "HeLa Jeopardy."

Wednesday, March 20, 2013
Cancer: A Survivor's Story
1:10 pm to 2:30 pm
RFK Hall, Room G-201/202
Guest Speaker:  Dan FosterJoin us as Dan Foster shares his personal experience as a colorectal cancer survivor and fundraising advocate for cancer prevention and treatment. (Sponsored by the Health, Physical Education & Dance Deparement, Health Services and the Health Related Sciences Academy as part of The Frank Egan Memorial Health Lecture Series.) Note:  All attendees are asked to wear blue in recognition of colon cancer.

Friday, April 26, 2013
Common Read Writing Contest Awards Ceremony
12:00 noon to 2:00 pm
S112
Hosted by:  Lauren Rosenblum
Join us as the top entries in our Common Read Writing Contest read their work aloud.  Prizes will be bestowed on first and second place winners in each of three categories:  Poetry, Essay (non-fiction) and Short Story (fiction).




Spring 2012 Common Read at Queensborough Community College

Featured text: To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee

TKaMBookCover
Ten Queensborough classes, as well as students from Benjamin Cardozo High School, Bayside High School, Hillcrest High School and Martin Van Buren High School, will read To Kill a Mockingbird and participate in the following activities.  The entire college community is invited.  For information on other scheduled events please see our LibGuide on the QCC Library Homepage or join our Facebook Group "To Kill a Mockingbird at QCC."  Events with an asterisk (*) have been taped and are available for viewing on TigerMedia.

Events:

Monday, February 27, 2012
Drop-In Read Aloud of
To Kill a Mockingbird
Location:  LB14
Time:  9:00 am to 12:00 noon
Students are invited to "drop-in" to participate in an oral presentation of the text.  Please bring a copy of "To Kill a Mockingbird" with you.

Wednesday, February 29, 2012
Race, Justice and White Privilege in the American South in the 1930s:  Examining the Trial in "To Kill a Mockingbird"*
Location:  Library, 3rd Floor, Open Area
Time:  10:00 am to 12:50 pm
Introduction and discussion by Dr. Megan Elias / Trial performed by student in Professor Michael Cesarano's Class
Join us as Dr. Megan Elias presents a brief introduction to the historical setting of "To Kill a Mockingbird."  Her introduction will be followed by a performance of the trail by students in Professor Michael Cesarano's Oral Performance for the Actor and Speaker class.  After the performance, audience members will be able to ask questions of Dr. Elias, Professor Cesarano and the student actors. 

Wednesday, February 29, 2012
Boo Who?  A Conversation on Boo Radley and Stigma in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Location:  S111
Time:  1:10 pm to 3:00 pm
Hosted by Jessica Rogers, Adjunct Lecturer, English Department

Thursday, March 1, 2012
Leaping Off the Page Part I:  From Words to Pictures
Location:  M136
Time:  3:10 pm to 5:00 pm
Examining the adaptation of a classic from novel to film.  Presented by Jillian Abbott, Adjunct Lecturer, English Department

Friday, March 2, 2012
Presentation of "Hey, Boo:  Harper Lee and 'To Kill a Mockingbird"
Location: LB14
Time:  11:15 am to 1:00 pm
A documentary exploring the story behind the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" including a portrait of Harper Lee's life via interviews with her friends, family and fans.

Monday, March 5, 2012
"To Kill a Mockingbird" Book Discussion
Location:  LB14

Time:  9:15 am to 10:30 am
Led by Professor Sandra Marcus

Wednesday, March 7, 2012
QCC Production of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Location:  QPAC Theatre - Humanities Building
Time:  1:15 pm
Talk-back session with the actors available after this performance.

Thursday, March 8, 2012QCC Production of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Location:  QPAC Theatre - Humanities Building
Time:  10:00 am
Talk-back session with the actors available after this performance.

Friday, March 9, 2012
Movie Presentation of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Location:  LB14Time:  10:30 am to 1:00 pm

Monday, March 12, 2012
Movie Presentation of "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Location:  LB14
Time:  9:30 am to 12 noon

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
"The Innocence Project:  Reflections on Wrongful Imprisonment"*
Guest Speakers:  Mr. Fernando Bermudez and Olga Akselrod, Innocence Project Staff Attorney
Loation:  M136
Time:  1:10 pm to 3:00 pm
Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird" tells the story of Tom Robinson, a man convicted of a crime he did not commit.  Although Lee's story takes place in the deep south in the 1930s, wrongful imprisonment continues today all over the world.  Join us as Mr. Fernando Bermudez tells us how he was wrongly conviced of murder and spent 18 years inprison.  He will be joined by Olga Akselrod, staff attorney at the Innocence Project, a national litigation public policy organization dedicated to exonerating wrongfully convicted individuals through DNA testing and reforming the criminal justice system to prevent future injustice.

Wednesday, March 14, 2012
Boo Who?  A Conversation on Boo Radley and Stigma in "To Kill a Mockingbird"
Location:  LB14
Time:  4:10 pm to 5:30 pm
Hosted by Jessica Rogers, Adjunct Lecturer, English Department

Thursday, March 15, 2012
Leaping Off the Page Part II:  If Only I Knew Then What I Know Now
Location:  M136
Time:  3:10 pm to 5:00 pm
Examining the adaptation of a classic from novel to film.  Presented by Jillian Abbott, Adjunct Lecturer, English Department

Friday, March 16, 2012
"To Kill a Mockingbird":  Child Development in the Midst of Turmoil*
Location:  LB14
Time:  10:30 to 11:30 am
Presented by Dr. Jeffery Jankowski. 
Join us as we take a look at the children portrayed in "To Kill a Mockingbird" from a psychologicalpoint of view.  Dr. Jeffery Jankowski will introduce Urie Bronfenbrenner's Ecological Systems Theory and discuss how his nested systems play a crucial part in the development of the children portrayed in the text.

Friday, March 16, 2012
Presentation of "Hey, Boo:  Harper Lee and 'To Kill a Mockingbird"
Location: LB14
Time:  11:15 am to 1:00 pm
A documentary exploring the story behind the novel "To Kill a Mockingbird" including a portrait of Harper Lee's life via interviews with her friends, family and fans.



November 2011 Common Read at Queensborough Community College
The Shawl, by Cynthia Ozick

TheShawlBookCover
In “The Shawl,” a woman named Rosa Lublin watches a concentration camp guard murder her daughter. In “Rosa,” that same woman appears thirty years later, “a madwoman and a scavenger,” in a Miami hotel. And, in both stories, there is a shawl—a shawl that can sustain a starving child or inadvertently destroy her or even magically conjure her back to life.

Six Queensborough classrooms will cover The Shawl and participate in the following activities. The entire college community is invited.

Events:

Wednesday, November 2, 2011
Oral Performance of the Text
Location: LB14

Time:  1:10 pm to 3:00 pm
Students will be invited to take turns reading aloud from their copy of the text.

Wednesday, November 9, 2011
Movie Event: 
The Devil’s Arithmetic
Location: S111

Time:  1:10 to 3:00 pm
This is the story of a modern (circa 1980s) teenage girl who halfheartedly accepts her family’s Jewish traditions. When asked to “open the front door to the prophet Elijah” as part of the Seder feast, she—like Dorothy of the Wizard of Oz—is transported to another place and time. Her arrival in 1940s Poland focuses on her experience as a prisoner in a German death camp.

Wednesday, November 23 ,2011
Tattoos and Identity
Location: M136

Time:  1:10 pm to 3:00 pm
During this event, students will have the opportunity to showcase their tattoos. They will be asked to present their tattoos to the audience, share their reasoning for getting their tattoos, discuss the actual experience of tattooing, share their thoughts on the permanence of tattoos, and reflect on the effect their tattoos have had on their lives. After all students showcase their tattoos, Miss Ruth Turek, an 84-year-old Holocaust survivor, will talk about her tattoo which was forced on her as a means of identification during the Holocaust.