INTRODUCTION to PHILOSOPHY         

BASIC COURSE INFORMATION

FALL 2013

ANNOUNCEMENT 12-21-13 FINAL GRADES ARE POSTED  !!!

  • Mondays   88011section B1 8:10-11:00  Grades <<< Click Here Find your grades for this semester here

  • Thursdays 88012 section B4  8:10-11:00 Grades <<<Click Here Find your grades for this semester here

ANNOUNCEMENT 8-28-13  Welcome 

This course is 15 weeks of work and thinking, thinking , thinking.   Are you ready! Fun, work, opportunities, work, rewards, work. 9 to 12 hours of work per week!!!! Explore new perspectives! Expect challenges to your cherished  beliefs!      A Survivor Course!

COURSE INFORMATION:

  1. Attendance:

  2. Grades:

  3. Calendar:

  4. Textbook: 

  5. Assignments

  6. Contact Information

  7. Course Objectives

  8. Academic Advice:

  9. Academic Integrity

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Attendance:  You are expected and required to attend class.  Absences will result in grade point penalties. More than two weeks of absences will result in a lower final grade.  COLLEGE POLICY: More than two weeks of absences (15% of total class time) will result in a final grade of “WU” for excessive absences. A "WU" is the equivalent of an "F" grade..  Repeated late arrivals or early departures will be noted and may result in a lower final grade. BASIC IDEA: Excessive absences (more than 15%) may result in a lowered grade or a "WU". A written (email) explanation for an absence may excuse that absence upon the discretion of the instructor.

Grades:

Mondays   88011section B1 8:10-11:00  Grades <<< Click Here Find your grades for this semester here

Thursdays 88012 section B4  8:10-11:00 Grades <<< Click Here Find your grades for this semester here

Final grade is determined as follows: 

Ten Written Assignments (10pts each): 1, 2, 3, 4a, 4b, 5a, 5b, 6,7,8

Some but not all may be revised after they have been graded and returned. This will be indicated when the assignments are returned.  Each assignment is worth 10 points.  BONUS Assignment-CULMINATING ACTIVITY: Worth 5 points.

GRADES:  You can look at your grades during the semester on the website.  There will be a projection of your final grade as well once you are past the second module of the semester. GRADES are posted after  Modules 1--2  and there are PROJECTED FINAL GRADES to answer the question "How well am I doing?"

PROJECTED GRADE=  This means the grade you would receive if you were to continue at your current rate of participation and achievement. If you are not satisfied with that grade and want to improve on it then you need to improve on your performance.  If it is not clear to you what needs improvement contact your instructor and ask for clarification and advice. Explanation of grades and grading is just below the grade table.

Your ID # for grades are the last four digits of your Blackboard username. 

FINDING your GRADES

Your grade is posted on " Grades " page.  Find those grades by going to the course menu or the left column and then click on "Grades"  Your grades are listed on the row with your Blackboard ID # on the left column.

If you don't know which number is your Blackboard ID # then do this:

  • Click " Home "  

  • Click "personal information" from tool box. 

  • Click "edit personal information" 

  • And see account information.  Look at #2 username and your ID # are the last  4 digits. 

  • Now go back to course, click grade button and look for your ID number on the left column.

FINAL GRADES:  The fastest way to receive your final grade is to look for it on the website under grades .  You can also email your request to your instructor at the end of the semester and you will receive a reply with your grade.

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Calendar:

Mondays   88011section B1 8:10-11:00 S111 Calendar for this semester<<

Thursdays 88012 section B4  8:10-11:00 S424 Calendar for this semester< Click Here

Textbook: 

only one required >> INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY <<Click Here

It is  an Online Textbook   NONE to buy!  the REQUIRED TEXTBOOK is FREE and on two websites located here:

Primary site: http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/SocialSciences/ppecorino/INTRO_TEXT/default.htm

Secondary Site: http://www2.sunysuffolk.edu/pecorip/SCCCWEB/ETEXTS/INTRO_TEXT/default.htm

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Assignments<<< Click Here

Each student is requested to submit the following assignments according to the schedule for the semester. Check on the COURSE CALENDAR for the due dates.   Remember to Go to iPASS and register there for services in support of the written assignments.  Follow the INSTRUCTIONS for PREPARING and SUBMITTING WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS

  • Do not violate academic integrity! 
  • Do not plagiarize!
  • Students must include citations and references and quotations.
  • Students must type or keyboard their papers and essays.
  • No more than two typographical, grammatical or syntactical errors per page.
  • Late papers and essays will NOT be accepted.

Assignments are intended to provide for an assessment of the learner's achievement and progress. Assignments and parts of assignments are intended to assess the learner's motivation, reading comprehension, critical thinking skills and appreciation of philosophy. 

Composing your assignment

Normally, you should compose your response using your word processor or on paper. This will give you the opportunity to revise, proofread, and spell check. When you have completed your assignment document be sure to spell check it . Some but not all may be revised after they have been graded and returned. This will be indicated when the assignments are returned.

Make sure to read the directions for each assignment carefully for details, due dates, and any thing else that may be specific to the assignment.

If at QCC Go to iPASS and register there for services in support of the written assignments

Format For Submitting Written Assignments 

Whether you are in an ONLINE CLASS or a traditional class or a hybrid class you must submit the assignments by EMAIL  ppecorino@qcc.cuny.edu   Do not send attachments!!!   Copy and paste your text from the word processor directly into the message window of the email.  In the subject line put:

first name , last name, PHIL 101, section #, assignment#

Evaluations:  The evaluation for your assignment will appear directly in your document or with your document when returned to you by email or returned directly to you by the instructor.  Evaluations are private and can only be read by the student and professor.

OBSERVE THE DUE DATES!!   Check on due dates:

If at QCC you can go to iPASS and register there for services in support of the written assignments.  The iPASS eTUTORS will assist you with your assignments for modules 2 through 7. 

In all cases the written work must show evidence of the author’s awareness of the materials made available in the online textbook and through the related Internet links found in the Online Textbook that is part of the course.   Proper citations and accreditation are to be made evident in the body of the work. The learners are required to provide evidence of research and scholarship and to AVOID Plagiarism!

Criteria for evaluation of the written assignments is given under Course Information document titled ” How you will be evaluated.”  Other students will not view student written assignments anywhere within the course.  Students may send drafts of their work to their classmates and discuss them through the use of email.   They may discuss the assignment itself within the course in the Student Cafι.

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Contact information<<< Click Here

Services for Students with Disabilities

Queensborough Community College is committed to providing opportunity and access to individuals with disabilities in all programs offered by the college.

The philosophy and mission of Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) is “to facilitate the academic success of students with disabilities through the provision of appropriate educational supports and settings while nurturing personal development.” This commitment is consistent with the guidelines set forth by the Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (P.L. 110-325).

Services for Students with Disabilities is here to provide the services and support that foster independence and student development on all levels. Students must register with the office to be eligible for accommodations, which are determined on an individual basis.

The office additionally serves as a liaison to faculty and the community regarding disability issues. Click here to view the newly revised 4th edition of Reasonable Accommodations- a Faculty Guide to Teaching Students with Disabilities.

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Course Objectives

A. DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC LEARNING OBJECTIVES

1. Identify some of the basic content in the field of Philosophy (vocabulary, concepts, theories)
2. Identify traditional and current Issues in Philosophy;  
3.Communicate awareness of and understanding of philosophical issues.
4. Demonstrate familiarity with the main areas of philosophic discourse and be able to state what major schools of thought there are that have contributed to the ongoing discussion of these issues  
5. Develop skills of critical analysis and dialectical thinking.  
6. Analyze and respond to the comments of other students regarding philosophical issues.
  

COURSE OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES

B. QCC General Educational Objectives

·         communicate effectively through reading, writing, listening and speaking

·         use analytical reasoning to identify issues or problems and evaluate evidence in order to make informed decisions

·         use information management and technology skills effectively for academic research and lifelong learning

·         differentiate and make informed decisions about issues based on multiple value systems

C.  CUNY PATHWAYS LEARNING OUTCOMES:As of Fall 2013 according to CUNY Chancellor Matthew Goldstein and Vice Chancellor Alexandra Logue  the learning outcomes must be as indicated below                    II.D. INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY

Gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view.

Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically.

Produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions.] 

Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring the relationship between the individual and society, including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications, cultural studies, history, journalism, philosophy, political science, psychology, public affairs, religion, and sociology.

Articulate and assess ethical views and their underlying premises.

Identify and engage with local, national, or global trends or ideologies, and analyze their impact on individual or collective decision-making.

Academic Advice:

How to do well in this class

OK , here is my very best advice concerning how to approach this course and do well. Read all the introductory materials.  Explore this site.  Take notes.

Read over the requirements for this course very well.

Get prepared somehow to put in 9-12 hours per week on the course at the computer and reading . 18-24 hours per week in the SUMMER SESSION

Time would be spent reading and writing and lots of thinking , thinking , thinking in between.

Ask questions of the instructor concerning assignments.

Ask questions of the instructor concerning the lessons.

Ask questions of the instructor concerning  the key questions.

Ask questions of your fellow students concerning  the key questions.

Get your written assignments in on time. 

If allowed to revise the written assignments to raise your grade, plan to do so. 

Take all topics and questions seriously, but not that seriously.  That is to say , you should realize that they are important; important enough to have changed the course of events and helped to shape our social world.  But they should not cause you to become overly concerned or worried sick over this. 

Have fun!  Philosophy is something I must do because it is in my nature to ask questions and attempt to look at things in different ways.  It would be very boring if Philosophy was just the same old stuffy and dry questions and ideas.  I hope to show you that it is far from that. Philosophy springs from that place deep inside our minds that gets disturbed by uncertainty, contradictions and inconsistencies, paradoxes, ironies, metaphors, sufferings and great joy and magnificent beauty. 

So, be prepared to work but prepare to explore and to be challenged and to be entertained a bit as well. In my estimation the hardest part of this course is finding the time.  Studies show that lots of people who take online courses do so because of time considerations.  So this is a key factor in determining what a student will be able to do and that in turn has direct bearing on how well someone will do in this type of course (nearly any course , for that matter.)

Research in Philosophy on the Internet.
Research in Philosophy on the Internet.
Free tutorial on doing research in Philosophy on the Internet.

http://www.humbul.ac.uk/vts/philosophy/index.htm

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If you have trouble then email me at:  
ppecorino@qcc.cuny.edu    I will respond the next business day.

Back to topQCC Policy on Academic Integrity

Academic Integrity

The college has an academic integrity policy and program. 

 http://www.qcc.cuny.edu/Governance/AcademicSenate/COAI/Docs/Academic_Integrity_Document.pdf

You may be severely penalized for violations of academic integrity.  Learn about it and observe the principles.  Among other things you must avoid plagiarism.

In this course, the penalty for violations of academic integrity is as follows:
1. First offense - the student receives the grade of "0" for the assignment and the possibility of more severe action at the discretion of the instructor.
2. Second offense - the student receives an "F" in the course and a Violation of Academic Integrity Report is filed with the Dean of Students.

There are Internet research papers required for this course. One of the requirements for these papers is that you locate websites and incorporate information from these websites in your paper. You must not only properly cite all information you use, but you are also expected to put the information into your own words. Each paper has a required minimum length, and direct quotes from other sources are not counted in determining the "word-count" length of your paper.

 If your paper contains material that is copied or paraphrased from any website, or from a paper previously submitted that material will be identified. If it is not properly documented, or if the quotation marks are absent, the material will be considered plagiarized.

AVOIDING PLAGIARISM
Plagiarism occurs when one steals or uses the ideas or writings of another and presents these writings or ideas as his or her own.

Some examples of plagiarism:
Buying a paper from a research service or term paper mill.
Turning in another student's work with or without that student's knowledge.
Turning in a paper a peer has written for you.
Copying a paper from a source (text or web) without proper acknowledgment.
Copying materials from a source, supplying proper documentation, but leaving out quotation marks.
Paraphrasing materials from a source without appropriate documentation.
Turning in a paper from a "free term paper" website. "
The above information was taken and paraphrased from:
http://ollie.dcccd.edu/library/Module4/M4-VII/plagar.htm
 

Plagiarism is the inclusion of someone else's words, ideas or data as one's own work without acknowledging the source. When a student submits work for credit that includes the words, ideas or data of others, the source of that information must be acknowledged through complete, accurate, and specific references and, if verbatim statements are included, through quotation marks as well. By placing his/her name on work submitted for credit, the student certifies the originality of all work not otherwise identified by appropriate acknowledgments. Plagiarism covers unpublished as well as published sources, including internet-accessed materials. Examples of plagiarism include but are not limited to:

• Quoting another person's actual words, complete sentences or paragraphs, or entire piece of written work without acknowledgment of the source;

 Copying another person's actual words without the use of quotation marks and footnotes.

• Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theory even if it is completely paraphrased in one's own words, without acknowledgment of the source

• Borrowing facts, statistics or other illustrative materials that are not clearly common knowledge without acknowledgment of the source

• Copying another student's essay test answers

• Copying, or allowing another student to copy a computer file that contains another student's assignment, and submitting it, in part or in its entirety, as one's own

• Working together on an assignment, sharing the computer files and programs involved, and then submitting individual copies of the assignment as one's own work

• Failing to acknowledge collaborators on homework and laboratory assignments.

 When in doubt about rules concerning plagiarism, students are urged to consult with individual faculty members, academic departments, or recognized handbooks in their field.
 

FORMS OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY VIOLATIONS[1]

 There are a number of ways that violations of academic integrity can occur. Principal among them are the four types listed below. It should be noted, however, that misconduct in any of these categories or combination of categories may be subject to disciplinary measures if it is deemed by the Office of Student Affairs, based on reports submitted by the Academic Departments, that the conduct rises to the level of disciplinary misconduct.

 Plagiarism

Plagiarism is the inclusion of someone else's words, ideas or data as one's own work without acknowledging the source. When a student submits work for credit that includes the words, ideas or data of others, the source of that information must be acknowledged through complete, accurate, and specific references and, if verbatim statements are included, through quotation marks as well. By placing his/her name on work submitted for credit, the student certifies the originality of all work not otherwise identified by appropriate acknowledgments. Plagiarism covers unpublished as well as published sources, including internet-accessed materials. Examples of plagiarism include but are not limited to:

• Quoting another person's actual words, complete sentences or paragraphs, or entire piece of written work without acknowledgment of the source;

 Copying another person's actual words without the use of quotation marks and footnotes.

• Using another person's ideas, opinions, or theory even if it is completely paraphrased in one's own words, without acknowledgment of the source

• Borrowing facts, statistics or other illustrative materials that are not clearly common knowledge without acknowledgment of the source

• Copying another student's essay test answers

• Copying, or allowing another student to copy a computer file that contains another student's assignment, and submitting it, in part or in its entirety, as one's own

• Working together on an assignment, sharing the computer files and programs involved, and then submitting individual copies of the assignment as one's own work

• Failing to acknowledge collaborators on homework and laboratory assignments.

 When in doubt about rules concerning plagiarism, students are urged to consult with individual faculty members, academic departments, or recognized handbooks in their field.

 Fabrication

Fabrication is the use of invented information or the falsification of research or other findings. Examples of fabrication include but are not limited to:

 • Citation of information not taken from the source indicated. This may include the incorrect documentation of secondary source materials

• Listing sources in a bibliography that are not directly used in the academic exercise

• Submission in a paper, thesis, lab report or other academic exercise of falsified, invented, or fictitious data or evidence, or deliberate and knowing concealment or distortion of the true nature, origin or function of such data or evidence

• Submitting as your own any academic exercises (e.g., written work, printing, musical composition, painting, sculpture, etc.) prepared totally or in part by another

 Cheating

Cheating is an act or an attempted act of deception by which students seek to misrepresent that they have mastered information on an academic exercise that they have not mastered. Examples of cheating include but are not limited to:

 • Copying from another student's test paper

• Allowing another student to copy from a test paper

• Unauthorized use of course textbook or other material such as a notebook or notes in any form to complete a test or other assignment

• Collaborating on a test, quiz or other project with any other person(s) without authorization

• Using or possessing specifically prepared but unauthorized materials during a test, e.g., notes, formula lists, notes written on the student's clothing, study aids, electronic or other devices or any unauthorized communication during an academic exercise, preparing answers or writing notes in an exam booklet before an examination.

• Using electronic instruments, such as cell phones, pagers, etc., to obtain or transmit or to share information, when prohibited

• Participating in any academic exercise such as a test using the name of another person or permitting someone else to participate in such an exercise for oneself.

 Academic misconduct

Academic misconduct includes any act to gain an undue academic benefit for oneself or to cause academic harm to another. Such misconduct includes dishonest acts such as tampering with grades or taking part in obtaining or distributing any part of an unadministered test. Examples of academic misconduct include but are not limited to:

• Stealing, buying or otherwise obtaining and possessing all or part of an unadministered test or academic device not authorized for such person to possess

• Unauthorized presence in a building or office or any location for the purpose of obtaining all or part of an unadministered test or academic device not authorized for such person to possess

• Selling or giving away all or part of an unadministered test, including answers to an unadministered test or academic device not authorized for such person to possess

• Bribing any other person to obtain an unadministered test, including answers to an unadministered or academic device not authorized for such person to possess

• Unauthorized presence in an office or any location for the purpose of changing a grade in a grade book, on a test, or on other work for which a grade is given

• Changing, altering or being an accessory to the changing and/or altering of a grade in a grade book, on a test, a change-of-grade form or other official academic records of the college which relate to grades

• Continuing to work on an examination or project after the allotted time has elapsed

• Taking an examination for another student. Asking or allowing another student to take an examination for you.

• Changing a graded exam and returning it for more credit.

• Submitting substantial portions of the same paper to two classes without consulting with instructors.

• Giving assistance or failing to report witnessed acts of academic misconduct/dishonesty.

• Depriving other students of access to library materials by stealing, destroying, defacing, or concealing them

• Retaining, using or circulating examination materials which clearly indicate that they should be returned at the end of the exam .

• Intentionally obstructing or interfering with another student's work.

• Promoting violations of academic integrity in any form, including but not limited to publicizing the availability of sources for obtaining papers and exercises

 Falsification of Records and Official Documents

 The following are some examples of falsification:

• Forging signatures of authorization.

• Falsifying information on an official academic record.

• Falsifying information on an official document such as a grade report, letter of permission, drop/add form, ID card or other college document.

 [1] Based on a University of Delaware listing and from Baruch College (CUNY) at:

http://www.baruch.cuny.edu/academic/academic_integrity.htm#falsification_records

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